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Writing Successful Slogans & Jingles: 11 Perfect Examples

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Some brand jingles and slogans are easily remembered. Others are easily forgotten.

That’s because different people remember different things.

A person can typically remember the jingle, its message, and (most importantly) the brand represented by it, when considering some of the best jingles and slogans over the last 30 years.

Sure, some stick out more than others. Some have been iconic; others have been legendarily awful.

But no matter how you slice it, the really good ones leave impressions that last years, decades, or even a lifetime.

Here are some of the most iconic jingles and/or slogans that have succeeded over the last three decades because of the high-quality writing behind them.

11. Motel 6: “We’ll leave the light on for you.”

This Motel 6 slogan was born in the best way: as an ad-libbed line-turned-instant success – and a perfect representation of the motel brand and its values.

Created off the cuff by NPR personality Tom Bodett, this slogan was an optimal way to convey the hotel chain’s welcoming spirit, affordable prices, and general availability.

A slogan that has lasted more than 30 years with showing no signs of stopping, it clearly stands for what Motel 6 is trying to communicate.

And it’s working.

If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.

10. Maybelline: “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline.”

Used since 1991, the slogan was the anchor for “the number one cosmetics company in America” and its advertising.

It made it until 2016, when it was replaced by the brand’s new “Make it Happen” tagline. But not before it was voted “most recognizable” over the last 150 years by Marketing Week in 2013.

9. Red Bull: “Red Bull gives you wings.”

Red Bull has been a revolutionary product creating a revolutionary experience since the Austrian company’s inception in 1987.

And what better way to do that than with a slogan like “Red Bull gives you wings” for an energy drink that was going to change your day, and ultimately your life?

Only problem was, Red Bull wasn’t offering much more than the average cup of coffee in terms of a jolt (via caffeine). And the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York decided that the slogan was misleading customers.

The extra pep in your step – or “wings” as Red Bull called them in its marketing – was deemed ambiguous and Red Bull paid out a $13 million settlement.

8. Skittles: “Taste the rainbow.”

Remarkably in its 25th year as the slogan for Skittles, “Taste the rainbow” has done plenty right.

What began in 1963 under the name “Glees,” Skittles have become the most popular non-chocolate candy in America with its iconic slogan.

Sure, being a tasty candy helps. But the brand’s marketing has found a way to keep the same slogan throughout multiple generations, all while effectively communicating with its audience in a way that has kept us listening, watching, and even laughing.

The slogan has helped convey an enticing image for its product and its relationship with the “rainbow” reference, a connection it will likely always – at least for the general future – be associated with.

And for good reason.

7. McDonald’s: “I’m lovin’ it.”

Another jingle that was communicated – at least in the beginning – by a famous personality was McDonald’s long-running slogan of “I’m lovin’ it,” which got assistance from Justin Timberlake in 2003 when it launched.

The fast-food company’s campaign was anchored around the J.T. song by the same name, which became one of Timberlake’s full-length songs on his album at the time.

McDonald’s spent $1.37 billion in advertising in 2003 when the campaign launched, which led to an 11% increase in sales that year ($17.1 billion).

So, yeah, you could say it worked.

6. Marines: “The Few. The Proud. The Marines.”

Used since 1977, “The Few. The Proud. The Marines.” has remained one of the Marines’ primary recruiting slogans, but it hasn’t been the only one.

Other, similar slogans were used (i.e., “If everybody could get in the Marines, it wouldn’t be the Marines”) but none of lasted as long as “The Few. The Proud.”

Each supplemental slogan has served a distinct purpose to the Marines recruiting missions in terms of needs of the military branch throughout different generations, according to the Marine Times.

“The Few. The Proud.” was nearly dropped in 2016 after the organization explored other possibilities but made a proud return to the Marines’ marketing strategy after a short hiatus in 2017.

“‘The Few. The Proud.” does a great job distinguishing (the Marines) from the other branches (of military) and making us prestigious to recruits, but it doesn’t say anything about what we do or why we exist,” said Lt. Col. John Caldwell, a spokesman for Marine Corps Recruiting Command, to the Marine Corps Times in 2016.

5. Army: “Be all you can be.”

While the Army has since stopped using its “Be all you can be” slogan, its impact cannot and has not been ignored.

And it still resonates today.

The slogan was used by the land warfare service branch from 1980 through 2001 and was eventually replaced by several new attempts to effectively reach its target audience.

First came “An Army of one,” which ran from 2001 to 2006 but didn’t show the same success as “Be all you can be.”

That was eventually replaced by the short salute “Army strong” in 2006, which was successful, but did not carry the same type of message as “Be all you can be,” according to Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel Dailey.

“‘Be All You Can Be’ was a national identity to the Army … it is still today,” Dailey said. “I can say ‘Be All You Can Be’ and people just – it was the national identity to the Army.”

That’s a slogan that’s certainly implanted in many of us who grew up around that 21-year stretch of “Be all you can be” messaging. I know I’m one of them.

4. Burger King: “Have it your way.”

The fast-food chain’s most successful slogan to date, “Have it your way” was a revolutionary call-to-action for Burger King’s customers to order what they want, how they want it.

It’s easily Burger King’s most well-known slogan in a battle that was devoted to catching up to McDonald’s while also fending off other chain challengers. The slogan helped (the best it could).

BK ditched the phrase in 2014 and has since replaced it with several new slogans, including the “Be your way” slogan and, most recently, “Feel your way” slogan, both obvious plays on the original jingle.

3. GEICO: “15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance.”

GEICO spends more than a billion dollars a year to tell potential customers they could save money if they use it as their insurance company.

It is the largest brand advertiser out there and it shows.

We all know the slogan – and the humorous commercials that often accompany it.

It’s simple, concise, and communicated across a multitude of mediums: switch to GEICO and you’ll save money.

It’s also (mostly) true, according to a study by Forbes.

Catchy, easy-to-remember, and, most of all, legitimate in its claim – the GEICO recipe for success has helped build one of the most noticeable brands in America.

It also helps to have deep pockets, A.K.A. budget.

2. Farmer’s Insurance: “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.”

Another insurance company making big noise in a clouded insurance market is Farmer’s.

Competing among some of the most notable advertisements in rotation (see: Geico, State Farm, All State), Farmer’s nails this slogan that is based on real-life facts and statistics and also relays a message of confidence and trust to its customers.

Built around the idea that Farmer’s has dealt with some seemingly unbelievable insurance claims – and properly taken care of those involved and covered by Farmer’s – the car insurance company-turned multi-line, multi-company insurer and financial services group has even built its Hall of Claims section on its website to back up its claim.

It’s tough to contend with high spenders like GEICO, but at least when Farmer’s does it, it drives home a strong and meaningful (and true!) slogan that can help put customers at ease.

1. Nike: “Just do it.”

The power of the best slogan of the last 30 years comes from not just its longevity, but its overall impact, not just on the fitness and footwear industries, but in powerful and meaningful walks of life.

That it would also help shift the industry when Nike needed it most makes it that much better, too.

Aiming to gain market share from other brands like Reebok, advertising executive Dan Wieden created the game-changing slogan on Nike’s behalf from two unusual places in 1988, further adding to the longstanding tagline’s lore.

“It was about the ultimate statement of intention,” Liz Dolan, former chief marketing officer at Nike, told The Washington Post. “It had to be personal.”

And it was, and continues to be.

Just as momentous as its support to helping Nike grow into the worldwide powerhouse it is today is the ability it has had to adapt and continue to still inspire to this day.

From Colin Kaepernick and his stance against social injustices, to women’s equality and admiration, to being a large part of some of the gutsiest performances by athletes across the world, Nike’s message has consistently motivated humans to be faster, stronger, and better.

“Just do it” has only grown in intensity and effectiveness as Nike continues to utilize the message and the underlying drive-home point in all of its overarching messaging.

It’s evolved into a cultural rally cry for standing up for what’s right, fighting your hardest, and making a real impact that isn’t limited to the field, court, or rink.

Nike will continue to use the infamous tagline for many more years to come, and it will likely keep winning by doing so and shifting with the times.

MARKETING

11 Free Email Hacks to Step Up Your Productivity

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11 Free Email Hacks to Step Up Your Productivity

If you’re anything like me, a solid portion of your day is sifting through your inbox, sending emails to junk, and responding to time-sensitive emails.

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How CTV can deliver market research for B2B marketers

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How CTV can deliver market research for B2B marketers

Connected TV (CTV) is the fastest-growing digital ad channel, as more TV watchers cancel cable subscriptions and turn to lower-priced or free a la carte streaming options they can watch on TVs, laptops and mobile devices. Many streamers are also potential B2B prospects, but not many B2B marketers are leveraging CTV for advertising.

“We believe connected TV advertising is undervalued, and there’s so much that digital, data-driven marketers can do with connected TV advertising that goes beyond the scope of any other ad channel,” said Hooman Javidan-Nejad, director of performance marketing for CTV advertising platform MNTN, at The MarTech Conference.

Why we care. Hit shows on streaming services get the credit for the CTV surge. But within these mass audiences there is data for targeting and segmentation. B2B marketers ahead of the curve have also experimented with streaming for delivering on-demand video content to prospects. 

Serving prospects ads on ad-supported Netflix, or managing your own video programming like a kind of B2B Netflix, is a much different experience than traditional whitepapers that recognize professionals’ changing media consumption and self-serve research habits.

CTV data. “Data-driven marketing has picked up in the last decade because the nature of all those digital channels are enabling you, and empowering you, to have access to the data and to act on it,” said Javidan-Nejad. “This is something that we never had for a TV — [traditional linear] TV advertising has always had limited or no reporting.”

Because of CTV’s digital infrastructure, ad campaigns on that channel have performance and measurement data that can be used as a market research tool.

“The beauty of approaching connected TV just like another digital channel is that you can apply the same targeting criteria you are applying today on LinkedIn, or on Facebook,” he added. “The insights that you’re getting from connected TV advertising can be applied to all the other channels, or the insights that you’re getting from the creative can be applied into the other channels.”

Dig deeper: Bringing your ABM strategy to CTV

Finding audiences on CTV. When advertising on CTV, B2B marketers should execute multiple campaigns, or target different audiences with a single campaign.

For example, a B2B marketer could run one campaign based on job titles, and another one based on firmographic criteria. You could also launch a retargeting campaign, based on first-party data acquired from those who have visited your website and shared their info.

“For each of these audiences, you will get audience segment reporting,” Javidan-Nejad explained. “So you will be able to see which of these audiences have performed better, which of these audiences had a better verified visit rate, and all the other metrics [to discover] which audiences are performing better. And then you can take those audience insights and apply them to the other channels.”

Matched audiences. B2B marketers can also use existing customers and prospects from their CRM and match them with a CTV adtech partner, in order to deliver CTV ads to those prospects when they’re watching streaming TV.

“This is the same audience that you’re using across all the other paid social channels,” said Javidan-Nejad. “The insights and learnings that you get from CTV can be extended and implemented across the other channels.”

Testing creative. Before committing a large budget on a robust TV campaign, B2B marketers can test different kinds of creative on CTV to determine what messages and visual cues stick with customers and prospects.

While every digital ad channel has its own sweet spot for what works in video ads, some of these insights about what works best on CTV can be applied to other channels.

“We are all familiar with A/B testing,” Javidan-Nejad said. “As digital marketers, we always try to leverage this feature or functionality across all the other digital channels. Now you’re able to do that for your TV advertising.”

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How to Write YouTube Titles for SEO

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How to Write YouTube Titles for SEO

Creating a video is a creative process which involves a lot of brainstorming, editing and producing. But the success of your video does not 100% rely on the quality or originality of that video.

Whether your video is going to be a success is determined by how many people will be able to find it and watch it.

Don’t underestimate the discoverability of your video. It may make or break your whole video marketing strategy performance.

One of the biggest channels that can drive findability of your video is search engine optimization, i.e. optimizing your video page for it to rank in search engines (mainly Google and Youtube search) for relevant keywords.

And one of the most important SEO elements of any page is its title.

What is a Youtube title?

“Title” is what you see on the browser tab when you open any Youtube page:

It is controlled by the “Title” field which is required when you upload your video to Youtube:

In the code of the page the title can be found within <title></title> tags.

On a Youtube video page, the title is also repeated underneath the video as the main heading making it also an on-page SEO element.

Youtube allows you to enter up to 100 characters to the title field and I recommend making the most of those 100 characters.

How can titles impact the findability of your video?

Page titles are key on-page SEO elements because they do both:

  • Page titles are direct ranking factors (Google uses them to understand what the page is about)
  • Page titles impact click-through by being the most visible parts of standard search snippets.

In that respect, Youtube SEO is not much different from any other types of SEO. The only slight difference is Youtube videos also get an additional section in organic results which you can target: Page titles are also included next to video thumbnails in video carousels:

Since titles are so important for your video findability and clickability, spend some extra time brainstorming effective video titles. Here are a few ideas:

How to create an effective Youtube title

1. Include your keyword

This is important in the context of this article. Keywords are still very important for SEO because they still help search engines understand the main topic of your page.

Keyword research is also a great way to estimate a demand for any topic (by looking at the search volume).

Identifying your main keyword and including it into the page title will help that video page rank for that keyword driving views for your video and generating additional brand visibility to your business. There are lots of tools and plugins allowing you to identify your target keywords.

It is a good idea to grab URLs of your competing videos and run them through this SEO Content Checker to identify their keyword usage and learn from that:

2. Make it sound interesting

I know it sounds obvious but there are too many boring video titles for me not to mention it.

Your video title needs to invite a click, so make sure it is interesting enough to invite one.

I realize it sounds easier than it really is and in many cases it is also highly subjective. But there’s a tool to help.

Using ChatGPT will help you find some ideas, in case you are stuck. Here’s what the tool was able to generate when I requested the following “Generate video title ideas that will include “Youtube marketing” keyword. Make those titles sound intriguing:”

There are quite a few pretty nice ones. If you don’t like what the tool suggested, keep asking it for more, changing your request just a bit to make it think harder.

This tool is great but make sure to pick a title that won’t over-promise. There’s a fine line between “intriguing” and “click-baiting.” Try and avoid the latter as it may reflect badly on your branding strategies.

3. Include numbers

Including a number in your page title has proven to be an effective way to get more people to click it. Click-through is likely to be an (indirect) ranking factor, so if more people click your title, there’s a good chance it will rank higher.

You cannot make each of your videos a listicle though, so you won’t be able to use this trick in each of your Youtube titles. But it is a good format to keep in mind and use from time to time.

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4. Mention a brand (if there’s one to mention)

Finally, if your video is about a well-known brand (for example, if that video is of you speaking at an event) or, more importantly, if you create it in collaboration with a well-known expert and/or influencer, include that name in your title.

Not only will it help your video rank for that searchable name, it will also increase its click-though thanks to people recognizing that name. 

Youtube also allows you to tag that name in the title (much like tagging works on Twitter or Facebook). If you add @ and then start typing that name, Youtube will allow you to select that name from the drop-down (if that brand or person has a Youtube channel). This will notify them on the mention and urge them to engage with the video helping its visibility:

No need to include your brand name though (unless that video is all about you or your company). If you pick your Youtube name well, it will help you build your brand’s recognizability with every high-ranking video because the channel name is always included in search snippets.

Keep a close eye on your results

Finally, creating an effective title is something that you can never do perfectly. There’s always room for improvement and experimentation. Learn from other well-performing videos in your or outside your niche and never stop experimenting.

Monitor video carousels for your important keywords to get notified when a new video succeeds in getting there and not what may have brought them that success. There are SEO monitoring tools that can help you with that task:

Additionally, keep a close eye on your Youtube analytics to monitor keywords that generate views from Youtube search and learn from those results:

Conclusion

You spend hours creating your video. It deserves a good title which will help your video get found. Spend some time brainstorming an effective title, experiment with different formats and measure your success. Good luck!



The post How to Write YouTube Titles for SEO appeared first on DigitalMarketer.

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