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LinkedIn Continues to See ‘Record Levels’ of Engagement and Sessions Growth

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LinkedIn Loses Latest Appeal in Ongoing Data-Scraping Case

Okay, I’m not sure I understand what ‘record levels of engagement’ means to LinkedIn.

Today, as part of its latest performance update, LinkedIn’s parent company Microsoft has shared that LinkedIn revenue grew 26% in the most recent quarter, while user sessions grew 22% – ‘with record engagement’.

Which seems fine – until you also consider that LinkedIn has reported ‘record levels’ of engagement since 2018.

More specifically:

  • In October 2018, Microsoft reported record levels of engagement and LinkedIn sessions growth of 34%
  • In January 2019, LinkedIn sessions rose 30% with record levels of engagement
  • In April 2019, LinkedIn saw 24% sessions growth, with record levels of engagement
  • July 2019 – sessions up 22%, record levels of engagement
  • October 2019 – sessions up 22%, record levels of engagement and job postings
  • January 2020 – sessions up 25%, record levels of engagement
  • April 2020 – sessions up 26%, with record levels of engagement
  • July 2020 – LinkedIn sessions grew 20% (no mention of record engagement this time around)
  • October 2020 – sessions up 31% with record levels of engagement
  • February 2021 – sessions up 30%, record levels of engagement
  • April 2021 – sessions up 29%, record engagement
  • July 2021 – sessions up 30%, record engagement
  • October 2021 – sessions up 19%, record engagement
  • January 2022 – sessions up 22%, record engagement
  • April 2022 – sessions up 22%, record engagement

So, going on these reports, since 2018, active LinkedIn sessions have increased by some 418%, in a time where LinkedIn has added 47% more members around the world.

LinkedIn member map - July 2022

Is it actually possible that LinkedIn has seen ‘record levels’ of engagement growth for virtually every quarter for the last four years?

Of course, the devil is in the detail. While Microsoft has reported sessions and engagement growth, it hasn’t actually provided a scale of comparison, i.e. what exactly ‘record growth’ means in this context.

The assumption is that LinkedIn is seeing significantly more activity every quarter, but there’s no specific figure here to quantify these stats. There’s no data, for example, which says that people are commenting more on posts, or using post reactions more often, or sharing more updates.

As such, we don’t exactly know what ‘record engagement’ means. But it doesn’t seem possible that LinkedIn is breaking its own engagement record every single quarter, right? Like, if there were x million comments, x million reactions/likes, and x million shares in Q1, it couldn’t have bested those exact marks again every time.

Right?

I don’t know, it seems a little off – but according to Microsoft, LinkedIn engagement remains very strong, with sessions continuing their upward trajectory, and its member count continuing to rise.

In terms of revenue, Microsoft has reported a reduction in LinkedIn ad spend – as we’re seeing on all platforms – though even then, LinkedIn’s revenue, overall, has continued to rise.

Microsoft also notes that it’s been increasing its investment in LinkedIn, which has boosted the company’s operating expenses.

But overall, LinkedIn performance seems solid, I guess, given the limited data we have to go on.

Given the noted growth in engagement, it makes sense that LinkedIn has been putting a bigger focus on content of late, and on supporting creators, in order to help them establish stronger connections with their in-app audiences.

LinkedIn’s added newsletters and LinkedIn Live access to its Creator Mode, along with improved content analytics, while it also recently expanded its Creator Accelerator Program, which provides advice and support for rising thought leaders.

In some ways, it’s strange to think of LinkedIn looking to establish a creator ecosystem like Instagram or TikTok, where the majority of content creators are focused. But if LinkedIn wants to keep its users coming back, it needs to give them a reason to do so, and new, fresh posts from popular talent is a key way to maintain engagement, and keep the discussion going beneath its updates.

LinkedIn’s also testing Carousel posts, which are already one of the best performing content types in the app, while it’s also continuing to build out its events and live video tools.

In combination, LinkedIn is well positioned to capitalize on the market recovery that will follow in the wake of the pandemic. Which may take some time, but eventually, hiring activity will ramp up once again, and LinkedIn is now the place to be to showcase your skills and capabilities within a professional context.

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Twitter Publishes 2023 Marketing Calendar to Assist with Campaign Planning

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Twitter Publishes 2023 Marketing Calendar to Assist with Campaign Planning

Looking to map out your content calendar for the year ahead?

This will help – Twitter has published its annual events calendar, which highlights all of the key dates and celebrations that you need to keep in mind in your planning.

The interactive calendar provides a solid overview of important dates, which could assist in your strategy. You can also filter the list by region, and by event type.

Twitter marketing calendar 2023

You can also download any specific listing, though the download itself is pretty basic – you don’t get, like, a pretty calendar template that you can stick on your wall or anything.

Twitter marketing calendar 2023

Twitter used to publish downloadable calendars, but switched to an online-only display a couple of years back. Which still includes all the same info, but isn’t as cool looking.

Either way, it may help in your process, as you map out your 2023 approach.

In addition to this, Twitter’s also published an overview of some of the major events that it’ll be looking to highlight in the app throughout the year, along with a pitch to advertisers, amid the more recent chaos at the app.

As per Twitter:

We’re moving more quickly than ever, and we’re still the place people turn to see and talk about what’s happening. A great example is the recent FIFA Men’s World Cup. We saw a whopping 147B impressions of event-related content on the platform, up nearly +30% from 2018. We also generated 7.1B views on World Cup video1, with everything from memes to nail-biter outcomes to history being made.”

There’s also this:

Not only is Twitter alive with content and conversation around big moments, but we are also growing. We saw global mDAU acceleration in Q4 to 253.1M, driven by an average sign-up rate of more than 1 million new daily users across Q42.”

That’s the first official usage stat Twitter has shared since Elon Musk took over at the app, and is a significant jump on the 238 million mDAU that Twitter reported in Q2 last year, its last market update before the sale went through.

It’ll be interesting to see if that usage level holds, as Twitter works through its latest changes and updates.

You can check out Twitter’s 2023 marketing calendar here.



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‘Stop the hate’ online, UN chief pleads on Holocaust Day

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A person visits the Holocaust Memorial, in Berlin, Germany on January 27, 2023, on International Holocaust Remembrance Day

A person visits the Holocaust Memorial, in Berlin, Germany on January 27, 2023, on International Holocaust Remembrance Day – Copyright AFP Michal Cizek

The UN secretary-general warned of social media’s role in spreading violent extremism around the globe as he marked Holocaust Remembrance Day on Friday, urging policy makers to help stop online hate.

Antonio Guterres said parts of the internet were turning into “toxic waste dumps for hate and vicious lies” that were driving “extremism from the margins to the mainstream.”

“Today, I am issuing an urgent appeal to everyone with influence across the information ecosystem,” Guterres said at a commemoration ceremony at the United Nations. “Stop the hate. Set up guardrails. And enforce them.”

He accused social media platforms and advertisers of profiting off the spread of hateful content.

“By using algorithms that amplify hate to keep users glued to their screens, social media platforms are complicit,” added Guterres. “And so are the advertisers subsidizing this business model.”

Guterres drew parallels with the rise of Nazism in 1930s Germany, when people didn’t pay attention or protest.

“Today, we can hear echoes of those same siren songs to hate. From an economic crisis that is breeding discontent to populist demagogues using the crisis to seduce voters to runaway misinformation, paranoid conspiracy theories and unchecked hate speech.”

He lamented the rise of anti-Semitism, which he said also reflects a rise of all kinds of hate.

“And what is true for anti-Semitism is true for other forms of hate. Racism. Anti-Muslim bigotry. Xenophobia. Homophobia. Misogyny”

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Weird of the Week

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Weird of the Week

What happened when six doctors swallowed Lego heads for science, and the results of Santa’s DNA test. Plus, is Dolly Parton really recording an album with Slipknot?

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