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5 Tips to Create a Linktree for Instagram in No Time

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5 Tips to Create a Linktree for Instagram in No Time


If you use Instagram, you might have seen the phrase “link in bio” before.

This means that someone is directing people to go to their Instagram profile page and click the URL that’s in their bio. Driving people to these links often helps Instagram users generate traffic on different websites, like a YouTube channel or website landing page.

But the native linking option only allows businesses and creators to share one link in an Instagram bio, which can prove challenging if you want to share multiple links with your audience.

In this post, learn how Linktree is a solution to help you share multiple high-quality links with your followers and discover high-quality examples from brands already using the tool.

 

What is Linktree on Instagram?

On Instagram, a Linktree is a simple link in your bio that leads to a landing page containing multiple links to content relevant to your business, like your website, a video, or even an affiliate discount link.

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You may be wondering why using this tool can make a difference on Instagram, and we’ll discuss this below.

Should you use Linktree for marketing on Instagram?

Linktree is helpful for marketing on Instagram because it helps you direct users to multiple different content offerings. So instead of only sharing, say, a link to your website, you can also link to your various social channels, your newest YouTube video, or a recent partnership you launched.

Another common use case on Instagram is if you run multiple campaigns on the platform at once, as your Linktree can contain links relevant to each of the different buyer personas you target.  

When considering leveraging Linktree on Instagram, the main factor to consider is that it helps you drive additional traffic to other high-impact sources. If you don’t use a Linktree, you’ll likely be updating your bio every time you want to direct users to a new piece of content, or you link to a website page where users can take additional action.

If driving traffic from Instagram is not a top priority for in-platform marketing, Linktree likely isn’t for you as it does require upkeep to ensure you don’t share so many links that users get overwhelmed by their choices.

If you want to leverage the tool in your Instagram strategy, let’s discuss how you can create one.

How to Create a Linktree for Instagram

1. Navigate to linktr.ee/, select the purple button that says Get Started For Free, and fill out the required contact information to create your account.

linktree account creation pageImage Source

2. Follow the on-screen prompts and enter the desired name for your Linktree and a business category that relates to what you offer.

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3. Select your preferred business plan, Free or Pro.

The image below shows the differences between the tiers, the most significant being cost (free vs. $6 per month). The pro version also comes with additional customization options and advanced analytics for understanding how users interact with your links.

linktree account plan optionsImage Source

4. After selecting your plan, you should land on the Links page, where there is a purple Add New Links button and a black Explore Links button.

linktree link addition pageImage Source

5. To begin adding links to your Linktree, you have two options:

Select Add New Link to add your first new link, and a card (as shown in the image below) will appear where you fill in the relevant Title and URL.

add new link to linktreeImage Source

Or, select Explore Link to view various link options that you can add depending on their content, such as music or video links.

linktree explore links dropdown menuImage Source

Regardless of the method you choose, your completed link should look similar to the image below.

example of a filled out linktree tileImage Source

6. Once you’ve added all of your links, the icons at the bottom of the tiles allow you to make card-specific edits.

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linktree card icon tilesImage Source

If you have a free account, you can upload your own tile thumbnail, gate the link for specific audiences, and view the number of times your tile has been clicked.

With a pro account, you can take all of the free actions, in addition to highlighting specific links as priority links, scheduling when certain links go live, and accessing more in-depth analytics.

7. Add all the relevant links you’re hoping to include in your Linktree. Note that the creation tool shows live previews so you can see what your final product will look like as you work in the phone icon on the right-hand side of your screen, as shown in the image below.

linktree: sample profileImage Source

Once you’ve added all your links, you can begin customizations.

8. Select the Appearance tab on your screen’s top left-hand corner.

9. In the profile window, insert relevant information to the links you’re offering, including Profile Title, a brief bio, and a business-relevant image.

linktree: profile edit screenImage Source

10. In the themes window, select a Linktree theme that meets your preferences. The image below is an example of a customized Linktree.

sample linktree profileImage Source

If you have a pro account, you can design your own theme, edit background colors, choose button shapes, and change fonts.

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11. Under the settings tab on the top left header, you can further edit your Linktree and add support banners, ecommerce integrations, and social media icons to link to your other social profiles.

If you have a pro account, you can do everything previously mentioned in addition to adding mailing list integrations for email or SMS.

12. Once you’re satisfied with your Linktree and how it looks it’s time to put the link in your Instagram profile. 

How to Add Linktree to Instagram

There are multiple ways to add your Linktree link to your Instagram profile. The first way is to:

1. Within Linktree, select the Add Linktree to your socials button in the Share dropdown menu and click Instagram, as shown in the image below.

add linktree to instagram profileImage Source

2. You can simply select the Copy button and choose your URL, navigate to Instagram and click Edit Profile, and paste the link into the Website field in your Instagram profile. Or,

3. Click the Go to my Instagram button to be immediately taken to your profile and insert the link there.

Now that you know how to create your Linktree and add it to your Instagram profile let’s go over some examples from brands that already use Linktree on Instagram to meet their business needs.

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Instagram Linktree Tips

  • Choose relevant names for your links: You want to use a Linktree to easily send your customers to different sites, so ensuring you name each link in a way that clearly says what it’s linking to increases effectiveness.
  • Use descriptions wisely: If you use descriptions in your Linktree, ensure that you use them wisely so users can clearly understand your links. Ensure that descriptions aren’t too long either, or you may lose audience attention.
  • Only include the most relevant links: While it may be tempting to have as many links as possible, it’s best to only place the most relevant links in your Linktree, so users aren’t overwhelmed with options. For example, if you’re running a new campaign, consider only linking to that one and removing links from older campaigns.
  • Use branded tools: if you have a Linktree pro account, use the custom branded tools that will help your users content your Linktree to your brand assets that they already know and recognize, like custom icons and color schemes.
  • Continuously monitor your Linktree: Continuously monitor your Linktree to ensure it’s up to date with your current business offerings. This means removing irrelevant links that will distract from what you’re hoping to center and monitoring analytics to see if you need to make any changes to your Linktree strategy.

Instagram Linktree Examples

Black Owned Everything

Black Owned Everything is an online marketplace that champions Black-owned businesses and the products and services they sell. It uses a Linktree on its Instagram profile to call attention to its different offerings, as shown in the image below.

example of a linktree in Instagram profile: black owned everything

Image Source

Why We Like This:

Black Owned Everything’s Linktree is successful because it includes links that are clearly labeled for users to understand and find what they are looking for, and there are also very few links. As a result, viewers likely aren’t experiencing decision paralysis as they don’t need to put in additional effort to find what they are looking for.

Patsy’s

Patsy’s is a dessert business based out of Brooklyn, NY. It sells Caribbean rum cakes made from scratch and uses a Linktree to help profile browsers order their cakes and view recent collaborations.

example of a linktree in Instagram profile: patsy's rum cake

Image Source

Why We Like This:

Patsy’s uses Linktree as a unique way to call user attention to a holiday ordering guide that walks users through the process of placing an order. While it could simply share this information in an Instagram post, users may not want to read a lengthy caption. Instead, Patsy’s can direct users to the link in its bio to quickly navigate to the ordering landing page.

Sean Garette 

Sean Garette is an esthetician that uses Instagram to share helpful content with their audience. They also have a branded Linktree in their bio where they share links to recent collaborations and partnership discount links.

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instagram linktree example: sean garrette

Image Source

Why We Like This:

Sean Garrette shows us the value of using a Linktree to plug partnerships with other businesses.

You can always post about the partnerships you have on Instagram, but if they’re long-standing, people might forget they exist. You can place affiliate links in your Linktree to remind users that your partnerships are still running and, if you successfully drive users to your Linktree, all of your traffic will come across these links.

Golde 

Golde is a business that sells superfood and wellness products. It uses Instagram to provide educational content and product photos and has a branded Linktree in its Instagram bio.

instagram Linktree example: golde

Image Source

Why We Like This:

While Golde does have more links in its Linktree, users aren’t overwhelmed by choices because each link clearly states what it is, and the emojis provide additional explanations. If you have multiple links that you want to share with your users without overwhelming them, use Golde’s Linktree as inspiration.

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TikTok

TikTok uses Instagram to call attention to trends, updates, and high-performing videos on the app. In addition, it has a branded Linktree in bio, which is pictured below.

instagram Linktree example: tiktok

Image Source

Why We Like This:

TikTok’s Linktree is a great inspiration because it drives users to critical actions related to the app: downloading the app, understanding trending moments and sounds, and contacting customer support. It also contains branded links in the footer of the Linktree that users can navigate to and easily understand where clicking will land them.

Should you choose to use Linktree, you’ll be able to share multiple high-impact links with your audience all at once, giving them more ways to interact with your business and become engaged in what you have to offer.

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How To Plan a Content ‘Season’ Like a Hollywood Showrunner

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How To Plan a Content 'Season' Like a Hollywood Showrunner

What should we talk about in our content?

This question plagues many content marketing teams. The brand message might be crystal clear. The products have clear value propositions and differentiators. The marketing team understands its paid media schedule, the agency is working out the creative elements, and the PR team is readying news around new hires, products, and partnerships.

The content team, however, struggles with topics.

Content marketers often approach this by getting a meeting together to brainstorm.

Here’s how that usually goes:

Someone from the demand generation team suggests creating a list of all the questions buyers might ask about the company’s particular approach.

The product marketing manager likes that idea and says, “We could create articles answering those questions and then sprinkle in how we solve those challenges.”

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The brand marketing manager says, “Why don’t we write some posts about our new brand mission and how our products and services are helping solve climate change?” They punctuate their suggestion by throwing a copy of Simon Sinek’s Start With Why onto the table.

The product marketing manager chimes in: “Yes, and we could sprinkle in a bit about how our product solves those challenges.”

“I know,” says someone from PR, “let’s write posts that feature profiles of our executives and their thought leadership in the market.”

The brand marketing manager nods in appreciation. “Yes, great idea. That’s storytelling. It’s got a hero.”

The product marketing manager stands up and says, “I like it. And maybe the executives could talk a little about how our product solves difficult challenges.”

Only the content marketing team sits silently, looking down at their notebooks. They’ve taken exactly zero notes.

The pizza arrives, and the meeting ends. The brand marketing manager says, “I don’t know what you all were so worried about. We’ve got tons of things to talk about.”

HANDPICKED RELATED CONTENT:

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Finding the bigger story

I work with content marketing teams for brands all over the world. I’ve noticed that when teams struggle to find a focused editorial direction for their content platform, it’s usually because they haven’t set the foundation for a bigger story.

Without a focused story (or stories), any alternative feels valid. As a result, their blog feels like an ad hoc collection of answers to FAQs. The resource center is a random collection of promotional materials and case studies. Their webinar program is just a catch-all featuring whoever is available to talk about how their product solves things.

I’ve discussed the importance of planning before. But within that planning process description lies the assumption that the relevant teams have met to decide on a bigger story to use as a foundation for planning.

But what if that hasn’t happened yet? How do you go about finding that bigger story?

As it turns out, you can learn a lot from media operations.

An overarching story helps #Content end the struggle to find editorial direction, says @Robert_Rose via @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

What TV showrunners know

Television series are created by teams representing all aspects of producing great content. There are writers, directors, actors, editors, production specialists, and so on.

Similarly, multiple teams come together when a brand’s content marketing team embarks on a thought leadership program or content marketing initiative. These teams also rely on diverse experts: writers, designers, subject matter experts, and others.

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Both teams face similar problems. This chaotic, creative process requires participation from many different groups.

How do you align all those disciplines and develop a cohesive story?

The question in Hollywood: “What’s the story?”

The question in content marketing: “What’s the story?”

Here is an approach that I’ve seen work in both situations.

Find the story – then plan it out over a season

The first thing I advise content marketing teams to do is this: Find the focus for a story they want to tell over a specific period on specific platforms.

I’ve talked before about the approach of using your brand story to find your content stories and even rebooting your story from content you’ve written before.

But another (often overlooked) aspect of this first step is to plan how your story will play out over time.

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Hollywood showrunners do this by bringing all the writers together to generate ideas about episodes and character development arcs.

Content marketers can learn from this. Why not bring the team together to plan out a bunch of ideas that would help you tell a complete story?

Think of it like planning out an entire season of content. For example, you might theme your editorial strategy for the coming quarter, build it around a curriculum, or even align it to the seasonal calendar.

With this approach, you’ll end up with more than a list of titles of articles, posts, or assets to create. You’ll have planned different chapters (or episodes) of a broader story that may end up as many kinds of digital assets for different platforms.

Think of #content planning like plotting out an entire TV show season, says @Robert_Rose via @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

Outline the chapters – then create your packages

The next step for showrunners is to create outlines of the episodes that make up the show’s season. These detailed story outlines help the other professionals understand when things like specific locales, guest actors, or bigger budgets may be necessary.

In content marketing, outlining your story’s upcoming chapters can help you decide which formats would work best. For example, you may decide that for the initial “episode,” you want to create an article and a blog post. But you want to combine the second episode with a white paper, a webinar, and a blog post.

Deciding on these packages separates the content development from the digital assets you’ll package them into. Creators get a heads-up that they’ll need to write the content for the various interfaces selected to optimize accordingly. Designers will have a complete portfolio of content that they can use to create all the assets needed.

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Planning at this level of detail enables the true benefits of a content calendar. All the teams can see plans for the story to unfold and all the different platforms where it will be told. They may start to see that the content season will meet their needs – reducing the demand for ad hoc assets.

Planning a full season of #Content lets internal teams see how the story will meet their needs, says @Robert_Rose via @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

Create the content ­– not necessarily the assets

In the next stage, Hollywood showrunners assign the writing for the various episodes. All the writers know the story and the outlines for upcoming episodes so that the showrunner can choose the optimal writer for each episode.

A content marketing team might assign the first couple of episodes to one writing team, then assign another team to take up the project for episode three.

Think of it like this: If you’ve mapped out your entire story, you and the team know what’s coming. You can work on the chapters simultaneously, knowing that things can change if needed. More importantly, this approach lets you work ahead instead of constantly chasing deadlines.

The key here is to write the content, not necessarily the digital assets. The goal is to have the stories created well ahead of the deadlines in your story schedule. For example, one successful content marketing team I’ve worked with makes a “content digest” for each of their episodes. This single document includes all the written content for all the places it will live (e.g., promotional ads, blog posts, social posts, long-form articles, etc.) and a creative brief for all the asset elements the content will be packaged into. Once the content reaches production, the creative team creates all the design containers simultaneously.

Approaching content separately from production means you may have 10 or more episodes ready to go before the first one even publishes. This lets you adjust the production schedule as you learn from each episode as it rolls out. If episode 1 goes exceedingly well, for example, you can make changes to episode 6.  You’ve seen this in action with your favorite series. A character becomes a fan favorite in episode 1 – and suddenly has much more screen time by episode 5.

Additionally, it’s a much more efficient process. You know episode 3 (which is already written) will need a thought leadership paper, a webinar, and a blog post. Fantastic. Now, you know how to help the production team schedule their efforts. And, you have the room to change if the first webinar is so successful that you want to add more.

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One story to rule (out) them all

Setting the bigger story in place and working the plan through cross-functional teams does more than give you production efficiency. It also provides focus. You can weigh any proposed idea against something important: the bigger story.

So, when that inevitable “Yes, and can we sprinkle in a little more about how our product solves that challenge” comment comes in?

You can look down at your copious notes and say, “I’m sorry, that’s not part of this particular story.”

Remember, it’s your story. Tell it well.

Get Robert’s take on content marketing industry news in just five minutes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

Watch previous episodes or read the lightly edited transcripts.

Subscribe to workday or weekly CMI emails to get Rose-Colored Glasses in your inbox each week. 

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute



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