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I Did the Scary Thing, and WOW!

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I Did the Scary Thing, and WOW!

I decided to do something scary and counterintuitive last week. Something so unheard of, that some business owners would think I was crazy.

And I may totally regret this…

But first, some backstory…

Over the last fifteen years, my focus has been on large, corporate brands (for instance, AAA was a client.) I loved digging into complex stakeholder and process issues, creating out-of-the-box solutions, and helping their writing teams thrive.

Heck, one AAA travel division saw a huge bump in traffic after my training — and this was DURING THE PANDEMIC when people weren’t traveling.

It was so much fun, and I loved it…

…Until I realized something was eating at my soul.

I come from a small business owner background. I watched my parents stress over their bed and bath store (RIP, Bedcetra,) trying to sell products and figure out a business.

It was a lot — and this was before Google. I’m 100 percent sure my mother’s aneurysm death was due to business stress.

I was just 20 when it happened.

Today, business owners — whether they have an office or live strictly online — have it even harder than my mom ever did.

They don’t have time to figure out the latest Google changes.

They don’t have time to figure out what to write about.

They don’t have time to coach themselves and get their mindset right.

So, they pay a LOT of money to so-so firms to help them.

One friend pays $4,500 a month for one blog post that looks like it was written by ChatGPT, plus a few random social posts.

When I ask about performance or a content strategy, my friend gives me a blank look. It’s so bad, her blog posts aren’t even attributed to her — and she’s one of the top experts in the nation. Her stupid SEO/branding company shows them as written by “Staff.”

Yeah, that’s not good for her, Google, readers — or anyone.

And this kind of &#%@ is NORMAL.

Plus, there are so many companies (maybe even you) that need only a few hours of help every month.

They don’t want to (or can’t afford to) get stuck in a long-term retainer contract. They need flexibility and affordability.

(Maybe that sounds familiar.)

This hit close to home when I was chatting with someone about my Slow Branding package. It’s a $5K+ package that offers all sorts of customized help — basically, I ignore the clock and work with someone whenever and however they need me.

It’s great for a seasoned professional who can invest time and income. It’s not so great for someone who isn’t making bigger money yet.

This person is smart and motivated. Yet, she’s at the beginning of her freelance career, so $5K is more than she could do right now. And I get it — even if I know I could accelerate her learning curve so much.

And I won’t suggest people “put it on their credit card and consider it an investment.” Yes, in-depth coaching can be transformative. But that’s a big expense when money is a stressor.

Although she could have worked with me hourly, the investment — especially at that level — would add up fast. For her, the math didn’t make sense.

That’s when the wheels started turning…

Between that experience, trying to help my friend shave down her $4,500/month spend, wanting to help an integrative medicine clinic that’s doing amazing work with ketamine-assisted therapy, and thinking about what makes me happiest, I realized my soul was at a crossroads.

I can continue to charge high consulting prices and only work with large corporations — and figure small/medium businesses aren’t my market.

Basically, do what I’ve always done — even if it doesn’t fill my soul.

And let’s face it: This is the time in my career when I can make that money. Many OG SEOs charge $750+ an hour. One charges $5K a month just for access to his brain with no guaranteed hours.

Or…

I could do the scary thing, slice my hourly rate by more than half, and help smaller businesses and solopreneurs who need it.

So I’m doing the scary thing.

And OMG, it’s scary — especially since most “experts” would tell you to (1) never work hourly, (2) never discount your prices, and (3) always require a retainer.

At the same time, I think about my favorite clients back in the day, who were all paying around $299/hr for consulting, writing, coaching — all the things.

  • I became an embedded part of their businesses and worked with them for a few hours every month.
  • I felt like I was helping friends, so their successes became my successes.
  • I was able to help more freelance writers and solopreneurs
  • I felt more respect. (I’ll never forget the big-brand client who basically said, “Sorry your cat is dying, but we’ll want our money back if you postpone the training.”)
  • I felt happier and more integrated.

In fact, when I told my husband about my decision this morning, he reminded me that I was happiest when working with smaller clients. Larger clients may be cool for my checking account, but that’s not where my heart is right now.

(As a side note, I know I could do both — but I’ve been saying that for years, and that hasn’t been my reality. When I go in, I go ALL IN. And that means focusing on one target market — small businesses.)

So here’s where I’ve landed — and I’m trying this as a one-month experiment.

  •  New clients can work with me for $299/hr (This doesn’t include my Slow Branding training package or customized trainings with all the things. Those are more intensive engagements that require more Heather time.)
  •  I’m starting with limited a block of $299 hours to see how things go.
  •  You can purchase one hour or a block of time that I’ll reserve for you (which is best for ongoing work, including coaching, sales page writing, or content consulting.) The time is yours.

Here’s the link if you want to schedule one hour.

Contact me if you want to reserve more of my time.

  •  If you’re unsure how much time something will take, hit “reply” and ask. I can’t (and won’t) write a sales page in one hour, but I can give you a time estimate.
  •  If you need me to review something prior to a call, cool — but that means less time on the phone. Hourly rates are, well, by the hour. The more time I have, the more feedback I can provide.
  •  If you want to work out a deal where we’re working X hours a month, every month, cool. (For instance, if you need weekly coaching or have a copywriting project.) Hit “reply” to this note, and we can work it out.

Oh, and for the folks who say $299/hour isn’t small business-friendly — I can spot stuff in 30 seconds that it takes people with less experience days to discover. If you can find your answer on YouTube, Google, or TikTok, go for it. I do that too!

But…if you want an expert pouring over your site and making suggestions — you’ll want to chat with me.

Why is this just a one-month experiment?

Because I may learn something new that bounces me in a different direction and feeds my soul in a different way.

I may find my idea isn’t as fun as I had hoped.

I may find that people don’t care, and nobody signs up — even with a one-month sense of urgency deadline.

I may find this idea pulls me away from creating training courses, which I also love.

I don’t know what I don’t know.

And that’s the point. I can keep doing what I’ve been doing, and feel so-so happy (and not particularly fulfilled.)

Or I can try something new and see what shakes out.

Wait! Won’t I take a financial hit for this?

Probably yes. Especially at the beginning.

I’d love to say that I was totally Zen about possibly “losing” money during a time when expenses are through the roof (sick kitties are expensive.)

Still, there are two things that make me feel like I’m on the right path:

  •  It’s more important for me to feel happy and fulfilled. When I dislike what I do, no amount of cash makes me smile. Which is why I never went the agency route — I knew I’d make bunches of cash and hate it the entire time.
  •  I’ve learned that taking a step back can sometimes result in a huge leap forward. I wouldn’t be surprised if I end up making more money because I’m enjoying myself more and meeting new people.

In short, I’m curious how this works out — and it will probably be in a wild and totally unexpected way.

What does all this mean to you?

First, it’s easier than ever to work with me!

But more importantly, I’d encourage you to take a look at something in your life and ask yourself, “What if I did the scary thing?”

You may find it’s what you’ve wanted to do all along. And it will feel so good once you do it again.

What do you think? I’d love to hear from you, so leave a comment and share your thoughts. Thank you!

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Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts?

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Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts?

Website traffic data normally looks like this:

Ups and downs, peaks and troughs.

If we’re doing our job properly, we generally expect traffic to trend upwards over time, but in any given month, it’s difficult to say whether a peak or a trough is worth paying attention to.

Did we do something great and trigger a new phase of growth? Did we benefit from a new Google update? Or is it just normal variation, part of the natural ebb and flow of people finding our website?

Or suppose you make a change to your content process—you pruned and redirected a bunch of old content—and then traffic dropped the next month. Was that drop caused by the change, or was it just a coincidence?

I’ve been experimenting with a simple statistical tool designed to help answer these questions: XmR charts, also known as process control charts.

Here’s an XmR chart:

Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR ChartsCan You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

XmR charts are designed to tell you whether any single data point from a time series is likely to be caused by normal fluctuation (“routine variation”) or a sign that something happened and needs to be investigated (“exceptional variation”).

XmR charts consist of an X plot (named after the x-value, the “thing” we care about—like widgets produced or sales closed)…

1721658366 562 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 562 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

…and an MR plot (named after the moving range, basically the “gap” between each data point):

1721658366 191 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 191 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

In its simplest use, if you plot your data on the chart and it wiggles up and down around the central line, without crossing the upper and lower bounds—no problem! These ups and downs likely represent normal variation.

But any points that appear outside the upper or lower bounds (shown in red) should be treated as anomalies that need to be investigated.

In the X plot above, the time series seems to show routine variation until January 16th, when the first red out-of-bounds point appears.

1721658366 804 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 804 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

The XmR chart suggests that something happened on the 16th to mess with our production process (for better or for worse). Our job is to investigate why.

Sidenote.

The line in the middle is the average value of the dataset; the upper and lower bounds represent 3-standard deviations away from the average (known as three-sigma). Any point that falls outside of these upper and lower bounds is very likely to be an anomaly, and not part of the original probability distribution.

There are other “signals” that the XmR chart can show you (like eight consecutive points on one side of the average line representing another type of exceptional variation)—but I will leave you to investigate those on your own time.

When I started reading about XmR charts, one obvious use came to mind: identifying the impact of Google algorithm updates.

If a site’s traffic tanks to zero, it’s easy to say “we were hit by a manual penalty.” But for smaller changes, like a few months’ consecutive traffic decline, it’s harder to work out the cause. Did we get caught out by a Google update? Is it seasonality? Or is it just a coincidence, with traffic likely to return to normal in the future?

Here’s two years of monthly organic traffic data for the Ahrefs blog, pulled from Site Explorer and plotted on an XmR chart:

1721658366 298 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 298 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

Now… this is not particularly useful.

There are tons of data points outside the expected range (red), with very few sitting nearer the center line than the quartile limits (orange).

The XmR chart is supposed to show exceptional variation in a consistent process—but in this image, almost all of the data points suggest exceptional variation. What gives?

Process charts were designed around simple manufacturing processes, and they work very well when the expected output of a process is constant.

If your goal is manufacturing 10,000 widgets each and every week, an XmR chart will help you work out if that 5,600-widget month was a normal “blip” in routine operation, or caused by a real problem that needs to be investigated.

Website traffic is more complicated. There are tons of variables that impact traffic:

  • the fluctuating search volume of each topic,
  • individual ranking positions,
  • new competing articles,
  • search features,
  • seasonality,
  • publishing frequency,
  • Google algorithm updates

That means that running an XmR analysis on a long series of traffic data probably won’t be very helpful. Your “blogging process” is not likely to remain stable for very long.

In my case, this particular two-year snapshot of data probably doesn’t come from a single, stable process—there may be multiple probability distributions hidden in there.

But we can make the analysis more useful.

The best practice for XmR charts is to limit the analysis to a period of time when you know the process was relatively static, and recalculate it when you suspect something has changed.

Looking at the Moving Range chart for this data below, large amounts of traffic variance happened in November and December. We should investigate possible causes. 1721658366 887 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 887 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

I know that our publishing frequency was fairly static (we definitely didn’t double our content output). Seasonality would cause a traffic drop, not a spike (we’re writing about SEO, not holiday gift guides).

But there was a big Google update at the start of December:

1721658366 313 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 313 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts
Source

If we work on the assumption that something happened to our blog process around this time—likely a change to traffic caused by the Google update—we can add a divider to our XmR chart.

Instead of trying to analyze our traffic as a single process, we can treat it as two processes, and calculate XmR charts separately:

1721658366 499 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 499 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

Now the first process looks stable (all black dots). The second process shows less extreme variation (red) too, but there’s still too much moderate variation (orange) to look stable. There may be another process lurking within.

And per a rule of thumb for analyzing XmR charts: “the duration of an XmR chart needs to be revisited when a ‘long-run’ of data remains above or below the Average line.” This trend begins in late summer (which is also around the time that Google announced another core update):

1721658366 566 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 566 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

We can add another divider at the start of this “long-run” of data to create three separate XmR analyses:

1721658366 941 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 941 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

In doing so, all three analyses seem stable, with no points of extreme variance. In other words, we seem to have done a good job at capturing three distinct processes happening within our traffic data.

From this analysis, there seems to be a good chance that our traffic was impacted by external factors around the time of two major Google updates.

Now… this is basically a post-hoc data torturing exercise. We can’t infer any causation from this analysis, and it’s entirely possible that other arbitrary divisions would yield similar results.

But that’s okay. These charts can’t give you definitive, concrete reasons why your traffic changed, but they can tell you where to look, and help you work out whether troubleshooting a traffic dip or spike is a good use of your time.

The ultimate measure of a model’s usefulness is its ability to help you predict things. Will XmR charts help me do a better job running the Ahrefs blog in the future?

I think yes.

Assuming my “blog process” remains relatively stable—I publish at the same frequency, target the same topics, compete with the same competitors—I now have a set of “stable” data that I can use to provide extra context for future traffic numbers:

1721658366 754 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 754 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

In the months that follow, I can work out whether dips or spikes in our traffic are likely the result of normal variance, or whether something has changed that requires my attention—like a Google update.

If, for example, my traffic does this next month… 1721658366 36 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658366 36 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

…I know that—given this distribution—that traffic drop could well be normal, unexciting variance.

But if it does this…

1721658367 676 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts1721658367 676 Can You Spot Google Updates with XmR Charts

…there’s probably something else at work.

With extreme traffic changes you can usually “eyeball” traffic charts and guess what happened. But XmR charts are useful for more subtle variations, and there’s a chance I will be able to identify and act on just a single month’s worth of data. That’s pretty cool.

Final thoughts

Troubleshooting traffic changes is a big challenge for SEOs and content marketers (and we’re working on a few ways to help you identify the signal amongst the noise of your traffic data).

In the meantime, I have found XmR charts an interesting tool in my toolkit, useful for contextualizing my monthly reporting numbers and justifying when I should (or shouldn’t) spend my energy troubleshooting a down month.

(At the very least, XmR charts might just give you the confidence necessary to say “get off my back” when that VP sends you a brusque 3AM email complaining about last month’s 8% traffic dip.)

Sidenote.

Thanks to Benyamin Elias, VP of Marketing at Podia, for introducing me to XmR charts.

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11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check Plagiarism

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11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check Plagiarism

Are you certain that the content you’re publishing on your website is 100% original?

Steering clear of plagiarism is a top priority for content creators, educators, businesses, and others in order to maintain credibility and avoid legal issues – among other things.

While Copyscape has long been one of the most well-known and popular options for plagiarism checking, the range of available tools has expanded significantly, with various features designed to meet people’s unique needs.

In this article, we will cover the basics of plagiarism – what it is, why you should check for it, how to check, and what to do if someone plagiarizes your content – before highlighting some of the top alternatives to Copyscape, helping you keep your content unique and valuable.

What Is Plagiarism? 

Plagiarism is when you use someone else’s work, whether words or ideas, and present it as your own without proper attribution.

Plagiarism can range from directly copying someone’s work to closely paraphrasing something without acknowledging the source. Sometimes, it’s purposeful, while other times, the perpetrator might not even realize they’re doing it.

Regardless of intent, plagiarism is a widespread problem that is difficult to combat – but the first step is detecting it.

Why It’s Important To Check For Plagiarism

The consequences of plagiarism can be severe – you can lose credibility, harm your reputation, and even face legal repercussions.

Here are a few reasons why it’s essential to check for (and avoid) plagiarism:

  • Prevent legal problems. Engaging in plagiarism or copyright infringement can expose you to a range of potential legal issues.
  • Maintain your reputation. Trust is vital. But why should audiences trust you if you’re stealing somebody else’s work? Checking for plagiarism is crucial to preserving your reputation and trust with your audience or customers.
  • Preserve your SEO efforts. Google and other search engines are actively trying to crack down on plagiarism and will penalize any plagiarized content. This can hurt your website’s ranking and visibility.

How You Can Check For Plagiarism

There are a handful of different ways to check for plagiarism, including:

  • Manual checks. This is precisely what it sounds like: manually reviewing content for plagiarism by cross-checking text using search engines and academic databases. If you’re examining a small chunk of text, this can work, but it can get unwieldy fast.
  • Use alerts. It’s possible to create your own plagiarism checker by setting up Google Alerts. Simply enter your content into the search query field and let Google know how frequently you want it to alert you of copied content. While not a totally accurate or complete method, it can be effective at times.
  • Monitoring services. You can use existing tools that help flag unauthorized use of your content. They do so by scanning the internet and leveraging algorithms to detect plagiarized content.
  • Online plagiarism checker tools. Software and tools designed specifically to analyze content and run a comprehensive check for plagiarism.

While checking text for direct plagiarism is one thing, identifying paraphrased content or ideas is much more complicated.

And while we will highlight many useful tools in this article, it’s worth remembering that no tool is perfect.

With the sheer amount of content available and more being produced and published every second, it’s nearly impossible to complete a full check. Hence, why plagiarism is an ongoing issue.

What To Do If Someone Plagiarized Your Content

So, what do you do if you discover that somebody else has plagiarized your content? Here are a few steps you can take:

  • Collect evidence. Take screenshots, make notes, and save any URLs as proof of the offense.
  • Contact the perpetrator. As we mentioned earlier, sometimes, plagiarism can be an innocent mistake. No matter the situation, we recommend contacting the offending party and requesting that they either remove your content or label it with the proper attribution.
  • File a complaint. If that doesn’t work, you can file a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) takedown complaint, which will send notice to the service provider (e.g., Google or web hosting companies) to remove the content or face legal liability.
  • Seek legal advice. If the case is particularly egregious, or the above steps fail, you can consider speaking with a legal professional.

Top 11 Plagiarism-Checking Alternative Tools To Copyscape

1. Grammarly

Screenshot from Grammarly.com, June 2024

While most people know Grammarly for its spelling and grammar check capabilities, it also offers a useful plagiarism checker tool.

Grammarly’s free plagiarism checker will compare your text (up to 10,000 characters) against academic databases and billions of webpages, then give you an immediate report that lets you know whether it found any plagiarized content.

As a helpful bonus, it will also flag if it finds problems with grammar, spelling, punctuation, conciseness, readability, word choice, or other writing issues.

If you want to take it a step further, Grammarly offers a Premium version of the tool with more advanced capabilities. The paid version will highlight specific sentences of concern, include source information, give you deeper writing feedback, and even allocate your text an “overall originality score.”

Cost

  • Free version available with limited plagiarism detection as well as basic grammar, spelling, etc. checks.
  • Premium Grammarly membership starts at $12/month and includes advanced plagiarism detection.

2. Plagiarisma

Screenshot of Plagiarisma homepage showing a text box for URL input, file upload options, and various supported languages icons. The page includes detailed information about the tool and highlights its effectiveness.Screenshot from Plagiarisma.net, June 2024

If you’re looking for a plagiarism checker that works in several languages, look no further than Plagiarisma. It supports 190+ languages and offers both free and paid versions.

Users can enter text into Plagiarisma in a variety of ways, including uploading documents, entering URLs, or pasting text directly into the tool. Once you’ve shared your copy, it will check it against sources like books, websites (you can choose between Google and Bing as your search engine of choice), and academic papers.

With the free version, users can run plagiarism checks up to three times in one day. You can also upgrade to a Premium membership for access to more features, including a Synonymizer (which helps you leverage synonyms to recreate sentences), a Similarity Checker (which compares documents for similarity), and unlimited access to plagiarism checks.

Cost

  • Free version with up to three plagiarism checks per day.
  • Premium membership starts at $5/month and offers unlimited plagiarism checks and more advanced features.

3. ProWritingAid

1720970763 998 11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check PlagiarismScreenshot from ProWritingAid.com, June 2024

Similar to Grammarly, ProWritingAid is an AI-powered writing assistant tool that analyzes your copy and suggests areas for improvement. It also offers a helpful plagiarism checker – and while there is no free version, it’s still reasonably affordable.

According to ProWritingAid, its plagiarism detection tool can compare your text (up to 2,000 words) against billions of sources, both online and offline, including databases, periodicals, and websites.

It will flag directly copied content and give similarity percentages to show areas needing improved paraphrasing or citation.

You can use ProWritingAid’s online editing tool to conduct your check or leverage its Microsoft Word Add-In.

Unlike some other tools, you pay for ProWritingAid based on the number of checks you want to conduct versus a monthly or yearly subscription – so that is worth noting, and might be a benefit if you only have a specific number of documents you need to look at.

Cost

  • No free version.
  • Pricing starts at $10 for 10 checks, $40 for 100 checks, $120 for 500 checks, and $200 for 1,000 checks.

4. Plagiarism Checker

Screenshot of Plagiarism Checker tool showing a text box to insert text, options to check plagiarism via URL, and buttons for grammar checking, paraphrasing, and various other settings.Screenshot from Plagiarism-Checker.me, June 2024

Plagiarism Checker is a fairly straightforward plagiarism detection tool that’s both free and easy to use. If you need a quick and simple option, this is worth checking out.

It boasts a simple user interface and allows users to insert their text directly into the web-based editor, share a URL, or upload a document. You can even denote a URL you want it to exclude, which is a helpful feature if there are particular pages on your site that you want to ignore for now.

Plagiarism Checker scans your text against blogs, websites, and academic papers to detect plagiarism, which it delivers as a percentage. It’s compatible with Mac, Windows, and Android, and supports multiple file formats, including .rtf, .pdf., .docx, .odt, and txt.

Note that there is a limit of 1,000 words per check. The tool also includes a grammar checker and word counter, and you can download the reports it gives you.

Cost

5. CopyGator

Screenshot of CopyGator website explaining how it helps monitor and track content feeds.Screenshot from CopyGator.com, June 2024

CopyGator is a free service designed to help bloggers and content creators monitor and detect duplicate versions of their content on other blogs or websites.

It works by monitoring your website’s RSS feed to see whether content has been republished elsewhere – and automatically notifying you if it finds plagiarism or quotations.

There are two different options for using CopyGator:

  • Image badge: By copying and pasting some code into your site, you can add a CopyGator image badge to your blog that will monitor your feeds for you. When you want to run a check, simply click the badge. If it turns red, CopyGator has detected plagiarized versions of your content.
  • RSS feed: Your other option is to input an RSS feed directly into CopyGator’s tool and ask it to watch the feed. It will create your own custom overview page where you can get updates.

Cost

6. PlagScan

1720970763 752 11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check PlagiarismScreenshot from PlagScan.com, June 2024

PlagScan is quite a robust plagiarism detection tool most commonly used by academic institutions and professional writers. One thing to note upfront: There is no free version of this tool.

PlagScan compares your text to a massive database of websites, academic resources, and journals to find plagiarism and compiles a report to help you understand the results.

You’ll receive a PlagLevel score, which summarizes the level of duplicate text found within a document, as well as colored highlighting for possible plagiarism:

  • Red for direct matches.
  • Blue for potentially altered copy.
  • Green for correctly cited text.

With PlagScan, you get a list of sources that match your document to help you with proper citation. You can also compare two documents side-by-side to find similarities. It works with most file types, and your data is protected.

Cost

  • No free version.
  • PlagScan uses a prepaid pricing model based on the number of words/pages. Pricing starts at $6.5 for 6,000 words/24 pages.

7. Copyleaks

Screenshot of the CopyLeaks Plagiarism Detector homepage, displaying highlighted text sections within an example showing potential plagiarized content. Various partner logos are visible below the displayed text.Screenshot from Copyleaks.com, June 2024

Copyleaks is a more sophisticated plagiarism detection tool than many of the options used on this list, making it a popular choice for businesses, educational institutions, and individuals around the world.

According to Copyleaks, it uses “advanced AI” to detect instances of plagiarism across over 100 languages, including paraphrasing, plagiarism in programming code, and even AI-generated plagiarism. Each scan checks content against 60 trillion websites, more than 16,000 journals, over 1 million internal documents, and 20+ code data repositories.

The tool has a very user-friendly interface, allowing you to choose from different types of files you might want to scan – text, documents, code, URLs, etc. You can also use the “compare” option to compare two documents or URLs to each other.

Another handy feature within Copyleaks is the ability to schedule recurring scans so that it will automatically check for duplicate content on a regular basis. It also offers easy and flexible API integration,

Cost

  • Free trial available.
  • Paid plans start at $8.99/month for up to 1,200 credits (equal to 300,000 words). For $13.99/month, you’ll get access to both the plagiarism detection and AI content detection tools in one.

8. Plagium

Screenshot of Plagium's plagiarism detection interface, featuring options for quick search, deep search, and file search with pricing details below. Screenshot from Plagium.com, June 2024

Plagium is a good choice if you’re looking for an easy and cost-effective plagiarism checker. It uses a simple web-based text box and offers both “quick search” and “Deep Search” functions, the latter of which is basically a term for a closer check and the ability to scan large documents.

A quick search is free and allows up to 500 characters – though the website appears to indicate that the number of quick searches is capped. In order to use the Deep Search feature, you’ll need to create an account – and these searches start at $0.08/page using Plagium’s credits system.

As a member, you’re able to upload different types of documents – such as PDFs – and Plagium also integrates with Google Drive and offers a Google Docs Add-on.

Cost

  • Free quick search up to 500 characters.
  • Paid plans start at $9.99/month for over 143,000 characters, with options for prepaid plans if that is more your speed.

9. Dupli Checker

1720970763 634 11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check PlagiarismScreenshot from DupliChecker.com, June 2024

Need a free, easy-to-use plagiarism checker that’s available in up to seven languages and accepts a variety of file formats? Dupli Checker could be for you.

Dupli Checker’s simple interface makes it easy to scan your documents for plagiarism. You can paste directly into the website or upload files from your computer, Dropbox, or Google Drive. Like other tools in this list, you can also share a URL you’d like the tool to check, and up to five URLs you want it to exclude.

The tool promises 100% privacy – meaning it doesn’t save any of your documents – and summarizes your results in a report that highlights duplicate copy, gives you a percentage rating, and offers more features like grammar issues.

Cost

  • Free version with up to 1,000 words per search.
  • Paid plans start at $10/month for increased searches, higher word limits, and other advanced features.

10. Quetext

1720970763 386 11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check PlagiarismScreenshot from quetext.com, June 2024

Quetext has become a popular plagiarism detection tool, and for good reason. It’s dependable and user-friendly, with some handy little features to help you spot plagiarism in your documents.

How does it work? You just enter your text into the web-based browser box and click “Check for plagiarism.” Quetext then uses its DeepSearch™ Technology (a machine-learning algorithm) to scan your text against billions of internet sources and spot plagiarism.

It provides you with a report that includes a plagiarism score and both exact matches and near matches to other existing text.

It highlights the latter using its ColorGrade™ feedback feature, which uses different colors to highlight exact match copy vs. “fuzzy” matches (or close matches) – a valuable tool for spotting plagiarism that might have otherwise flown under the radar.

It also offers a “Cite Source” feature, which helps you produce citations across Chicago, MLA, and APA formats.

Cost

  • Free version available, which includes up to 500 words, a website citation generator, and a citation assistant.
  • Paid tiers start at $8.80/month, which includes 100,000 words per month and a range of other advanced features.

11. PlagTracker

1720970763 220 11 Copyscape Alternatives To Check PlagiarismScreenshot from Plagtracker.com, June 2024

PlagTracker is an online, web-based plagiarism detector that bills itself as “the most accurate plagiarism checking service.” The tool lists students, teachers, publishers, and site owners as its intended users, and it checks text against over 14 billion webpages and “more than 20 million academic works.”

Using PlagTracker is pretty straightforward. Users upload a document into the tool, which scans it and then returns a detailed report that shows what percentage of their document is plagiarized and highlights specific sections with sources.

It supports multiple languages –English, German, French, Romanian, Spanish, and Italian – making it a versatile tool. PlagTracker has a 5,000-word limit for free users, though you can pay for a Premium membership for unlimited access.

Cost

  • Free version is available with a 5,000-word limit.
  • Premium subscription starts at $7.49/month for unlimited volume and other advanced features.

The Best Plagiarism Detection Tools On The Market

And there you have it: Copyscape is by no means the only option for plagiarism detection tools.

Those listed above are great alternatives that cater to a wide range of use cases, whether you’re looking for a cheap and easy solution or an all-in-one AI-powered writing assistant.

If you’re a content creator of any kind, you must produce work that’s original and unique – and these tools can help you do just that.

However, always remember that these tools are far from perfect; you should have other checks and balances in place to ensure the quality of your work.

Avoiding plagiarism will protect your credibility and reputation and ultimately drive more traffic to your website. Not to mention, it’ll keep you out of trouble.

More resources: 


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Google Warns Of Last Chance To Export Notes Search Data

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Google issues a final warning for users to download their Google Notes data

Google updated their documentation for the Google Labs Google Notes experiment to remind users that Notes will go away at the end of July 2024 and showed how to download notes content, with a final deadline beyond which it will be impossible to retrieve it.

Google Notes

Notes is an experimental feature in Google Labs that lets users annotate search results with their ideas and experiences. The idea behind it is to make search more helpful and improve the quality of the search results through the opinions and insights of real people. It’s almost like Wikipedia where members of the public curate topics.

Google eventually decided that the Notes feature had undergone enough testing and they decided that their are shutting down Google Notes, a decision announced in April 2024.

Update To Documentation

The official documentation was updated to make it clear that Notes is shutting down at the end of July and that users who wish to download their data can do us with their Google Takeout, a Google Accounts feature that allows users to export their content from their Google Account. Google Takeout allows Google Account holders to export data from Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Photos, a total of up to 56 kinds of content can be exported.

Google’s Search Central document changelog explains:

“A note about Notes

What: Added a note about the status of Notes to the Notes documentation.

Why: Notes is winding down at the end of July 2024.”

This is the new announcement:

“Notes is winding down at the end of July 2024. If you created a note, your notes content is available to download using Google Takeout through the end of August 2024.”

Check out the updated Google Notes documentation here:

Notes on Google Search and your website (experimental)

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