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Facebook Shares New Insights into the Impacts of COVID-19 on Small Businesses Around the World

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Facebook has this week published the latest update in its State of Small Business Report, which looks at the impact of COVID-19, and the global lockdowns to limit its spread, on SMBs in various regions.

The data, which Facebook has been tracking since July, incorporates responses from more than 30,000 small business owners across 50 countries, and highlights the key concerns and challenges they face as each seeks to maintain operations. And the insight provided is important for virtually every organization, as the flow-on effects will relate to spending in almost all aspects, and will lead to far-reaching economic shifts.

You can download the full, Global State of Small Business Wave III update here, but here’s a look at some of the key notes and charts.

First off, Facebook notes that more businesses are re-opening, with closure rates declining in almost all regions.

Facebook State of Small Business report

Though the impacts are relative – some sectors are seeing renewed impacts, with ‘Information and Communication’ businesses reporting a jump in closures in this latest update.

Facebook State of Small Business report

That likely points to the cumulative, ongoing impacts as businesses gradually assess the financial impacts of the crisis, and rationalize accordingly.

Overall sales are also down across the board, though digital-enabled businesses have been able to lessen the impact.

Facebook State of Small Business report

That’s important to note for digital marketers – according to the report:

  • 48% of consumers surveyed reported an increase in online spending since the outbreak of COVID-19, and 40% of respondents said they increased their use of social media and online messaging for product and business recommendations. 
  • Nearly two-thirds of shoppers surveyed who substituted one of their frequented businesses for a new one reported using digital tools to discover these new businesses. 

An active digital presence can have significant benefits, and that also looks set to remain true beyond the pandemic, with the rise of eCommerce accelerated by five years due to the shutdowns, according to one report. 

Sales numbers by sector are also down in general, with varying results in each niche.

Facebook State of Small Business report

Overall, the data shows that the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are not going to be felt immediately, they’re cumulative, and will show through more over time. Businesses that were not seeing as much impact in the last report are seeing more now, even as more are able to open, because the relative growth or decline may not be evident in immediate figures.

That underlines the ongoing challenges SMBs face, which, again, will impact all businesses in some form. Less spending with SMBs means less spending by SMBs, and with smaller operators dominating the market, that means that we’re all affected over time.

Hopefully, we’re moving closer to a time when we are able to safety re-open our economies, in order to mitigate these losses, but the data shows that we still have a long way to go, and that the flow-on effects will continue to trickle down until we reach that next stage.

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There’s a heap more data in Facebook’s full Global State of Small Business Report, which you can download here.

Socialmediatoday.com

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Brand creatives: The forgotten workers struggling with burnout

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Brand creatives: The forgotten workers struggling with burnout

Photo by Tim Gouw / Unsplash

The demand for quality content continues to rise and this is putting an added stress on creators. Analysts are predicting this year to be the longest selling season seen for many years. This presents little reprieve for creators.

While businesses everywhere are focused on work/life balance, that’s a luxury most creators do not have. Recently, Digital Journal posted an article about ‘hustle culture’ and the dangers this presents to employees in the long-term. Central to these concerns was burnout. Yet burnout is also an issue for the sell-employed and within this category, those working in the creative arts standout.

Social Media Creatives are people who carve out creative posts which are intended to be shared by a brand on their social media platforms, designed to help the brand to reach out more fully to their target audience.

Creator burnout encroaches on creator wellness, which is not only a threat to the creator, but also to brands and ultimately the consumer.

The extent of the problem is captured by Awin, an affiliate and influencer marketing platform. The company conducted a survey on creator burnout and this uncovered some telling information.

For example, 66 percent of creators indicated that burnout is affecting their mental health . The likelihood of this is related to the platform used. Here, Instagram is the leading platform driving burnout with 71 percent of respondents experiencing at least some level of burnout.

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Another source of emotional strain is with constant platform changes. These were cited by the survey respondents as the leading cause of anxiety amongst 72 percent of respondents. Another area scoring high, with  64 percent of people, relates to a lack of quality and creativity. In turn this creates pressures, for 53 percent of the survey admitted their passion for content creation has decreased in the past year.

Pressure of work are manifest in the need to be only for prolonged periods of time. Hence other reasons for burnout included never turning off social media, the pressure of losing followers, and the pressure of earning a paycheck. These pressures are driving just under half (49 percent) of people to rely on alternative income streams to alleviate the stress and anxiety.

Although there are no ideal coping mechanisms, measures like dedicating specific times for posting and scheduling time off can help.

Commenting on the findings, Carissa Finders, Influencer Partnerships Manager, Awin Group tells Digital Journal: “There is a clear pattern of burnout among creators and many feel there is little support from social platforms to help them cope.”

This support, says Finders, should be led by brands, noting: “In order to combat the anxiety and burnout, brands will need to work closely with creators to develop the best resources for them to passionately create and engage their audiences. Our goal in working with our creators is to facilitate these brand partnerships to make sure the creation and execution of influencer campaigns continues to be as smooth as possible for both parties.”

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