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10 Best Point-of-Sale Tools and Plugins for Your WordPress Business

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10 Best Point-of-Sale Tools and Plugins for Your WordPress Business

If your commerce platform is online and in-person, you need flexibility regarding payments. This article covers agile point-of-sale tools and plugins that can power your business on WordPress.

We will showcase some plugins and other options that allow you to have the flexibility of selling face-to-face with a customer or online, setting up your business for omnichannel success!

As you’ll see, many options are free and can be upgraded accordingly. They all have a good track record and are established point-of-sale (POS) systems that perform as a modern-day cash register (and are much less clunky, too).

We’ll take a look at the following:

Hopefully, after reading this post, you’ll have a good idea of what type of POS tool works best for your business and can set it up accordingly.

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But first…

Why Should You Use a Good POS system?

It may seem obvious. It’s because you need to sell in-person and online, right? However, there’s a bit more to it than that. A good POS system goes beyond just ringing up a customer.

Systems today can integrate with other systems, keep track of sales, manage merchandise – and offer some tech that can enhance your services to the next level.

Some benefits include:

— Sales can be streamlined from multiple locations.

— Your functionality increases.

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— Ability to keep track of real-time data.

— Having a better grasp on managing employees.

— Automatically get your taxes managed.

And more…

It’s vital to be up-to-date on what you can do when selling in-person and online with your WordPress website.

So, are you ready to cash in? Let’s go!

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Point of Sale Systems

Here are a handful of modern, efficient, and well-known POS systems to help your WordPress site. They’re in no particular order. (And please note: We are not affiliated with ANY of these. We just find them to be top-notch choices.)

FooSales

FooSales syncs your WooCommerce inventory with a point of sale.

If you’re using WooCommerce, the FooSales plugin is a POS system that will make any computer, iPad, or Android tablet into a physical retail space.

This plugin helps allow you to run your business from anywhere in the world and sell your WooCommerce items quickly and easily. It automatically syncs your WooCommerce product inventory, orders, and customer data.

The sales screen and search tools can promptly locate products with images and descriptions so that you can focus on the clients when they’re checking out. It adds items, shows the amounts of products, and offers a quick one-click checkout.

FooSales checkout process.
All the items are displayed – making it easy to locate and check out customers.

Payments can be made with Square and Stripe. It leverages the strengths of both platforms and allows you to enter credit card information or purchase add-on terminals for a monthly fee.

There is also a monthly fee associated with using this plugin. They vary depending on the number of websites and add-ons.

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Hike

Hike header.
Hike is another plugin option for WooCommerce POS.

For another WooCommerce option, Hike offers a POS solution in-store and online. It integrates with WooCommerce, allowing access to your customers, product catalog, inventory, and other necessary information.

With Hike, you can control and manage your entire business from a retail POS system. It works with iPads, PCs, and Mac products. It’s fully interactive with card payment systems like PayPal Here, Tyro, and iZettle.

There are many POS options, including offering discounts to sales, parking orders, enabling a custom sale, and adding order notes.

Plus, you can use your existing card terminal – so you don’t need to purchase one directly from them. That said, they offer hardware bundles for complete POS systems (cash register, receipt printer, etc).

Prices vary depending on the outlet, registers, and other factors.

Square

Square header.
Square is no stranger to modern POS systems.

A very popular POS is Square. Millions of brands use their software to accept payments in-store and online.

You can incorporate Square into your business quickly and easily – whether that be a WordPress developer’s website, restaurant, or street vendor – you name it!

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They have great solutions for getting paid with their flexible omnichannel commerce tools. They offer registers, terminals, stands, readers, and more for in-person sales. For online, there’s an app-like shopping experience, customization, the ability to highlight products, and more.

Their plans vary – but you can start for free. The free plan does take transaction fees, but otherwise, there are no costs. You can upgrade to include more features.

wePOS

wePOS header.
wePOS is a WooCommerce-focused plugin.

wePOS is another plugin that offers a fast and responsive WooCommerce POS option. You can easily take orders and track your inventory in your WooCommerce store.

Plus, you can physically count WooCommerce products by scanning bar codes and adding them directly to a customer’s cart to process the order.

It features a sleek UI that’s simple to navigate. From this, you can manage your inventory and orders.

wePOS example.
You can see the organized items, total costs, tax, and more.

There is a free version and upgrades available. They also have 24/7 support.

Oliver

Oliver header.
Oliver is here for your WooCommerce store needs.

With a 5-star rating, the Oliver  plugin for WooCommerce might be a great option for a POS system for your business.

They state: “It’s simple, smart, and easy to use.” Made specifically for WooCommerce, it allows for a consistent combination of eCommerce and physical brick-and-mortar stores. Everything is in one place, and there’s no need for multiple integrations.

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It’s designed to work with numerous devices, including iPad, Mac, or PC. The system supports using a mouse, touchpad, and keyboard entry.

They also have POS hardware, like a terminal, printer or all-in-one solutions.

Oliver is free to use, but upgrades are available. Plus, they include support.

Toast

Toast header.
Toast can be the toast of your POS solution.

Toast is named this for a reason – it specializes in restaurants. So, if your restaurant runs on WordPress or another platform, you may consider this system.

You’re able to manage all in-person and online sales in one place. They note that their restaurant-grade hardware is 3x faster than competitors, and you can integrate your FOH (front of house) and BOH (back of house) to reduce ticket times by up to 40%.

The Toast platform even includes payroll and team management – so it goes beyond just a POS option.

Their hardware includes handheld devices for ordering, kitchen display systems, self-ordering kiosks, and much more.

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It’s free to use. Like many of our other systems, upgrades are available depending on your needs.

Shopify

Shopify header.
Shop it to me: Shopify might be the POS solution you’re looking for.

Another well-known platform (millions of merchants and 10% of US eCommerce) is Shopify. Shopify allows customers to order online or in-person. It features one-click checkout that lets shoppers pay how they want – through digital wallets or multi-currency.

It includes a ton of insights into customer data. Everything from their behavior, total sessions, order numbers, and more.

Additionally, they incorporate your social media with tools for Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, and other channels.

There’s a whole range of what Shopify offers, hence why it’s so popular. Be sure to visit their website for more information.

And when it comes to pricing, there’s a free trial – otherwise, it does cost.

There are various levels that you can purchase, depending on what your needs are for your store.

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Stripe

Stripe header.
Stripe is no secret to POS.

Stripe is a very well-known POS company that offers solutions to millions of companies worldwide. It works with some of the biggest brands (Amazon, Instacart, Zoom, Lyft, etc).

For us, Stripe is incorporated into our Client & Billing in The Hub and Forminator plugin for accepting payments.

They feature everything that brings websites and apps together for payment. With support for 135+ currencies, it’s available for use with credit, and debit cards, virtual wallets, and more. Additionally, they have items, such as terminals, for in-person sales.

Plus, they are big on security, with a team of world-class security experts at their helm. They’ve also received regulatory licenses around the world.

Stripe is free to use but takes a percentage of the costs.

PayPal

PayPal header.
PayPal is another POS giant in the industry.

Like Stripe, PayPal is another payment solution we use for our products. PayPal’s popular with millions of other companies, too.

It’s known chiefly online; however, they offer POS software so you can run your business online and off.

Their POS offers streamlined checkout, business metrics, and an app. You can easily manage products with prices, stock levels, and more – all in one place.

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The portable terminal PayPal uses is entirely portable. It accepts most forms of payment (credit, debit, Google Pay, etc), and works with chip and contactless payments.

There is currently a 2.29% transaction fee and costs for the terminal. However, the PayPal Zettle app is completely free to use.

Stay On Top of Your Shop

Out of all of these 10 options we just covered, surely you can stay on top of your WordPress website’s sales – in-person and online. Whether it be a plugin or a separate system, modernizing your selling platform is quick and easy.

And with all of the latest advancements in selling (real-time analytics, instant checkout, inventory control, etc), there’s no reason to be stuck with anything but the most efficient method for your business.

For more information on online sales, check out our article on eCommerce gateways.

Once you have systems implemented, there is no stopping customers from shopping!

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10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPress.com News

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10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPress.com News

Whether you’re a design pro or a total newbie, you’ll find a great tool in this list that will take your website skills to the next level.

Designing a beautiful website from scratch can be difficult for developers of all skill levels. Luckily, in today’s Build and Beyond video, Jamie Marsland reveals his ten favorite WordPress design tools and websites to elevate your next build.

Get inspiration for your next website’s design and then start building with WordPress.com. Ready to get going? Click below to embark on your free trial today:

Here are the sites and resources mentioned in the video:

1713497163 978 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News

Heikei

Stunning backgrounds and visuals

1713497163 497 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News
1713497163 315 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News
1713497163 599 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News
1713497163 270 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News

Shots

Easy mockups for products and thumbnails

1713497163 518 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News
1713497163 631 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News

Coolors

Generate color palettes with a click

1713497163 689 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News
1713497163 719 10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News
10 Amazing WordPress Design Resouces – WordPresscom News

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[GET] The7 Website And Ecommerce Builder For WordPress

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The7 website and ecommerce builder for wordpress is the most customizable WordPress, Elementor, and WooCommerce theme available on the market up to …

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Making 43% of the Web More Dynamic with the WordPress Interactivity API – WordPress.com News

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Making 43% of the Web More Dynamic with the WordPress Interactivity API – WordPress.com News

Creating rich, engaging, and interactive website experiences is a simple way to surprise, delight, and attract attention from website readers and users. Dynamic interactivity like instant search, form handling, and client-side “app-like” navigation where elements can persist across routes, all without a full page reload, can make the web a more efficient and interesting place for all.

But creating those experiences on WordPress hasn’t always been the easiest or most straightforward, often requiring complex JavaScript framework setup and maintenance. 

Now, with the Interactivity API, WordPress developers have a standardized way for doing that, all built directly into core. 

The Interactivity API started as an experimental plugin in early 2022, became an official proposal in March 2023, and was finally merged into WordPress core with the release of WordPress 6.5 on April 2, 2024. It provides an easier, standardized way for WordPress developers to create rich, interactive user experiences with their blocks on the front-end.

ELI5: The Interactivity API and the Image Block

Several core WordPress blocks, including the Query Loop, Image, and Search blocks, have already adopted the Interactivity API. The Image block, in particular, is a great way to show off the Interactivity API in action. 

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At its core, the Image blocks allow you to add an image to a post or page. When a user clicks on an image in a post or page, the Interactivity API launches a lightbox showing a high-resolution version of the image.

The rendering of the Image block is handled server-side. The client-side interactivity, handling resizing and opening the lightbox, is now done with the new API that comes bundled with WordPress. You can bind the client-side interactivity simply by adding the wp-on--click directive to the image element, referencing the showLightbox action in view.js.

You might say, “But I could easily do this with some JavaScript!” With the Interactivity API, the code is compact and declarative, and you get the context (local state) to handle the lightbox, resizing, side effects, and all of the other needed work here in the store object.

actions: {
			showLightbox() {
				const ctx = getContext();

				// Bails out if the image has not loaded yet.
				if ( ! ctx.imageRef?.complete ) {
					return;
				}

				// Stores the positons of the scroll to fix it until the overlay is
				// closed.
				state.scrollTopReset = document.documentElement.scrollTop;
				state.scrollLeftReset = document.documentElement.scrollLeft;

				// Moves the information of the expaned image to the state.
				ctx.currentSrc = ctx.imageRef.currentSrc;
				imageRef = ctx.imageRef;
				buttonRef = ctx.buttonRef;
				state.currentImage = ctx;
				state.overlayEnabled = true;

				// Computes the styles of the overlay for the animation.
				callbacks.setOverlayStyles();
			},
...

The lower-level implementation details, like keeping the server and client side in sync, just work; developers no longer need to account for them.

This functionality is possible using vanilla JavaScript, by selecting the element via a query selector, reading data attributes, and manipulating the DOM. But it’s far less elegant, and up until now, there hasn’t been a standardized way in WordPress of handling interactive events like these.

With the Interactivity API, developers have a predictable way to provide interactivity to users on the front-end. You don’t have to worry about lower-level code for adding interactivity; it’s there in WordPress for you to start using today. Batteries are included.

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How is the Interactivity API different from Alpine, React, or Vue?

Prior to merging the Interactivity API into WordPress core, developers would typically reach for a JavaScript framework to add dynamic features to the user-facing parts of their websites. This approach worked just fine, so why was there a need to standardize it?

At its core, the Interactivity API is a lightweight JavaScript library that standardizes the way developers can build interactive HTML elements on WordPress sites.

Mario Santos, a developer on the WordPress core team, wrote in the Interactivity API proposal that, “With a standard, WordPress can absorb the maximum amount of complexity from the developer because it will handle most of what’s needed to create an interactive block.”

The team saw that the gap between what’s possible and what’s practical grew as sites became more complex. The more complex a user experience developers wanted to build, the more blocks needed to interact with each other, and the more difficult it became to build and maintain sites. Developers would spend a lot of time making sure that the client-side and server-side code played nicely together.

For a large open-source project with several contributors, having an agreed-upon standard and native way of providing client-side interactivity speeds up development and greatly improves the developer experience.

Five goals shaped the core development team’s decisions as they built the API: 

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  1. Block-first and PHP-first: Prioritizing blocks for building sites and server side rendering for better SEO and performance. Combining the best for user and developer experience.
  2. Backward-compatible: Ensuring compatibility with both classic and block themes and optionally with other JavaScript frameworks, though it’s advised to use the API as the primary method. It also works with hooks and internationalization.
  3. Declarative and reactive: Using declarative code to define interactions, listening for changes in data, and updating only relevant parts of the DOM accordingly.
  4. Performant: Optimizing runtime performance to deliver a fast and lightweight user experience.
  5. Send less JavaScript: Reduce the overall amount of JavaScript being sent on the page by providing a common framework that blocks can reuse.  So the more that blocks leverage the Interactivity API, the less JavaScript will be sent overall.

Other goals are on the horizon, including improvements to client-side navigation, as you can see in this PR.

Interactivity API vs. Alpine

The Interactivity API shares a few similarities to Alpine—a lightweight JavaScript library that allows developers to build interactions into their web projects, often used in WordPress and Laravel projects.

Similar to Alpine, the Interactivity API uses directives directly in HTML and both play nicely with PHP. Unlike Alpine, the Interactivity API is designed to seamlessly integrate with WordPress and support server-side rendering of its directives.

With the interactivity API, you can easily generate the view from the server in PHP, and then add client-side interactivity. This results in less duplication, and its support in WordPress core will lead to less architectural decisions currently required by developers. 

So while Alpine and the Interactivity API share a broadly similar goal—making it easy for web developers to add interactive elements to a webpage—the Interactivity API is even more plug-and-play for WordPress developers.

Interactivity API vs. React and Vue

Many developers have opted for React when adding interactivity to WordPress sites because, in the modern web development stack, React is the go-to solution for declaratively handling DOM interactivity. This is familiar territory, and we’re used to using React and JSX when adding custom blocks for Gutenberg.

Loading React on the client side can be done, but it leaves you with many decisions: “How should I handle routing? How do I work with the context between PHP and React? What about server-side rendering?”

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Part of the goal in developing the Interactivity API was the need to write as little as little JavaScript as possible, leaving the heavy lifting to PHP, and only shipping JavaScript when necessary.

The core team also saw issues with how these frameworks worked in conjunction with WordPress. Developers can use JavaScript frameworks like React and Vue to render a block on the front-end that they server-rendered in PHP, for example, but this requires logic duplication and risks exposure to issues with WordPress hooks.

For these reasons, among others, the core team preferred Preact—a smaller UI framework that requires less JavaScript to download and execute without sacrificing performance. Think of it like React with fewer calories.

Luis Herranz, a WordPress Core contributor from Automattic, outlines more details on Alpine vs the Interactivity API’s usage of Preact with a thin layer of directives on top of it in this comment on the original proposal.

Preact only loads if the page source contains an interactive block, meaning it is not loaded until it’s needed, aligning with the idea of shipping as little JavaScript as possible (and shipping no JavaScript as a default).

In the original Interactivity API proposal, you can see the run-down and comparison of several frameworks and why Preact was chosen over the others.

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What does the new Interactivity API provide to WordPress developers?

In addition to providing a standardized way to render interactive elements client-side, the Interactivity API also provides developers with directives and a more straightforward way of creating a store object to handle state, side effects, and actions.

Graphic from Proposal: The Interactivity API – A better developer experience in building interactive blocks on WordPress.org

Directives

Directives, a special set of data attributes, allow you to extend HTML markup. You can share data between the server-side-rendered blocks and the client-side, bind values, add click events, and much more. The Interactivity API reference lists all the available directives.

These directives are typically added in the block’s render.php file, and they support all of the WordPress APIs, including actions, filters, and core translation APIs. 

Here’s the render file of a sample block. Notice the click event (data-wp-on--click="actions.toggle"), and how we bind the value of the aria-expanded attributes via directives.

<div
	<?php echo get_block_wrapper_attributes(); ?>
	data-wp-interactive="create-block"
	<?php echo wp_interactivity_data_wp_context( array( 'isOpen' => false ) ); ?>
	data-wp-watch="callbacks.logIsOpen"
>
	<button
		data-wp-on--click="actions.toggle"
		data-wp-bind--aria-expanded="context.isOpen"
		aria-controls="<?php echo esc_attr( $unique_id ); ?>"
	>
		<?php esc_html_e( 'Toggle', 'my-interactive-block' ); ?>
	</button>

	<p
		id="<?php echo esc_attr( $unique_id ); ?>"
		data-wp-bind--hidden="!context.isOpen"
	>
		<?php
			esc_html_e( 'My Interactive Block - hello from an interactive block!', 'my-interactive-block' );
		?>
	</p>
</div>

Do you need to dynamically update an element’s inner text? The Interactivity API allows you to use data-wp-text on an element, just like you can use v-text in Vue.

You can bind a value to a boolean or string using wp-bind– or hook up a click event by using data-wp-on–click on the element. This means you can write PHP and HTML and sprinkle in directives to add interactivity in a declarative way.

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Handling state, side effects, and actions

The second stage of adding interactivity is to create a store, which is usually done in your view.js file. In the store, you’ll have access to the same context as in your render.php file.

In the store object, you define actions responding to user interactions. These actions can update the local context or global state, which then re-renders and updates the connected HTML element. You can also define side effects/callbacks, which are similar to actions, but they respond to state changes instead of direct user actions.

import { store, getContext } from '@wordpress/interactivity';

store( 'create-block', {
	actions: {
		toggle: () => {
			const context = getContext();
			context.isOpen = ! context.isOpen;
		},
	},
	callbacks: {
		logIsOpen: () => {
			const { isOpen } = getContext();
			// Log the value of `isOpen` each time it changes.
			console.log( `Is open: ${ isOpen }` );
		},
	},
} );

Try it out for yourself

The Interactivity API is production-ready and already running on WordPress.com! With any WordPress.com plan, you’ll have access to the core blocks built on top of the Interactivity API. 

If you want to build your own interactive blocks, you can scaffold an interactive block by running the below code in your terminal:

npx @wordpress/create-block@latest my-interactive-block --template @wordpress/create-block-interactive-template 

This will give you an example interactive block, with directives and state handling set up. 

You can then play around with this locally, using wp-env, using a staging site, or by uploading the plugin directly to your site running a plugin-eligible WordPress.com plan

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If you want a seamless experience between your local dev setup and your WordPress.com site, try using it with our new GitHub Deployments feature! Developing custom blocks is the perfect use case for this new tool.

The best way to learn something new is to start building. To kick things off, you may find the following resources a good starting point:


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