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How to Optimize Your Coworking Contact Page for Better Conversions

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How to Optimize Your Coworking Contact Page for Better Conversions


If you’re running a coworking business, you know that your contact page is key to your website. After all, it’s the page where potential customers can get in touch with you to learn more about your space and perhaps even book a tour. In this sense, every lead that reaches your contact page is important, and if you can convert more leads into members, your business will thrive in no time.

If you want to improve your conversion rate, it’s vital to ensure that your contact page is adequately optimized. So today, I’m going to share some tips on how to do just that. Keep reading for more!

What is a Contact Page, and Why is it Important for Coworking Businesses?

A contact page on a website provides visitors with information about how to get in touch with the business or organization. In most cases, the contact page is where leads go when they want to get in touch with you directly, usually after they’ve perused the rest of your website, meaning they’re already interested in what you offer.

Contact pages are important for any business since they help visitors feel there’s someone real running the business, someone they can reach out to and communicate with directly if they need to. While this is particularly important in industries prone to scams that rely on trust, like investment firms and trading platforms, it’s also important to coworking businesses.

For coworking businesses, the contact page is essential because it’s often the first real point of contact between the company and a lead, making it a clear opportunity to convert them into paying customers. A lead will go to a coworking space’s contact page because they want to find out more about the space, ask questions about the service, or even schedule a tour. On the other hand, they may just be interested in pinpointing the space’s exact location to see if it works for them, or they may simply want to get in touch with a real person for a more natural “human” interaction.

What Does “Conversion” Mean for Your Coworking Business’s Contact Page

In marketing, a conversion is nothing more than a goal that a website or a business wants a visitor to complete. In other words, it’s the ideal or desired outcome you want whenever someone visits a website, watches an ad, or reads a blog post. In PPC marketing, for example, typical definitions of conversion would be an action like clicking on an ad, signing up for a newsletter, filling out an email capture form, or making a purchase.

In a well-thought-out marketing plan, every ad, every web page, every CTA, and every asset we use has a specific role to play in driving the lead down the sales funnel or driving the visitor to the desired action. For coworking businesses’ contact page, although we could think that the ideal conversion would be to get the lead to book an office or sign up for a membership, that’s not always the case.

First, contact pages aren’t exclusively targeted to leads. They can also be targeted to media outlets or potential business partners. However, even in the case of leads, one of the most common conversion goals is getting visitors to schedule a tour of the space. There’s a simple reason for this. An in-person tour is the best way to show potential customers what your space offers in terms of amenities and the overall vibe. It’s also an opportunity for you to build rapport with the lead and establish trust. In other words, tours are what you should optimize for subscriptions and actual sales; your contact page is what you want to optimize to book those tours.

Information to Include in a Contact Page

There are three main groups of people who will go to a company’s contact page:

  • Potential leads who are already thinking about becoming paying customers.
  • Media outlets and reporters who want to get in touch for an interview or story.
  • Other businesses that want to partner up or collaborate.

Each of these groups has different needs, and it’s crucial that your contact page can accommodate all of them.

Information for Leads

For potential leads, you’ll want to ensure that your contact information is easy to find and that there are multiple ways for them to get in touch with you (e.g., phone, email, live chat, contact form). You’ll also want to include basic information about your business, such as your address, business hours, and a map with your precise location.

The goal is to make it as easy as possible for leads to get in touch with you and find the information they need. Remember, if they’re on your contact page, they’re interested in your business and are trying to take the next step. Don’t make it harder for them by hiding your contact information or making it hard to find.

Information for Reporters and Media Outlets

If you want to be featured in the press, you also need to make it easy for reporters to find your contact information and pitch you their story idea. You should have separate contact channels for the press, including a press email address and a link to your Press Kit (if you have one).

Information for Business Partners

If you’re open to partnerships with other businesses or perhaps are seeking someone to invest in your coworking space, your contact page should have a dedicated section for partner inquiries. Again, ensure the information is easy to find and that there are multiple ways for partners to get in touch (e.g., phone, email, contact form). It’s also important to show your current partners and other businesses you’ve partnered with in the past.

Linking to Your Contact Page From PPC Ads

Optimizing your contact page for conversions is useless if people can’t find your contact page. That’s why it’s vital to add easy-to-find links across your site. However, even with those links, it’s possible that your contact page may not get the traffic you would like. That’s where PPC comes to the rescue.

Adding a link to your contact page in a PPC ad is a great way to increase traffic to your contact page and, as a result, increase conversions. This can serve as a secondary goal of a PPC ad campaign (e.g., “Book a tour” or “Get in touch”).

When adding a link to your contact page in a PPC ad, there are two things you need to keep in mind:

  • The link should be visible and easy to find.
  • The CTA should be clear and match the ad’s messaging.

9 Tips on How to Optimize Your Coworking Contact Page for More Conversions

Now that we know what contact pages are, why they’re important for coworking businesses, what minimum information they should include, and how to drive traffic to them, let’s focus on how to get visitors to convert.

In this section, I’ll give you tips on optimizing a contact page for conversions, focusing on converting potential leads to help your coworking business grow. I’ll cover optimizing for reporters or potential business partners in a future post.

Tip #1: Make It Easy to Find Your Full Business Address and Contact Information

A coworking space is necessarily a brick-and-mortar business that members will visit in person, so there’s no point in doing anything other than being completely transparent about your business address. If you offer multiple coworking spaces, make sure visitors can easily find each space’s exact address. In these cases, it would be very beneficial to add a tool that allows them to type in an address they’re interested in and have the tool show the spaces nearest that particular address.

The same goes for your contact information. Include as many ways to get in touch as possible (e.g., phone, email, online chat, social media), and ensure that this information is also easy to find.

Tip #2: Make it Extremely Easy to Book a Tour or Make a Reservation

User experience is an important part of conversion optimization, and when processes are easier and require fewer steps, people are more likely to go through with them.

When it comes to booking a tour or making a reservation, you want to make the process as easy as possible. Ideally, booking a tour shouldn’t take more than two or three steps to complete.

 Tip #3: Minimize the Number of Fields in Your Contact Form

As an extension of the previous tip, when crafting your general contact form or the form to book a tour, you should make it as short and with as few fields as possible. Studies show that forms with fewer fields have much higher conversion rates than those that require more information. The more fields there are, the greater the chance someone will abandon the form altogether. At a minimum, you should only require an email address and name. If you need additional information, consider making some of the fields optional so visitors can just skip over them if they want. If you do, make sure to make it extra clear that they’re optional, so they’re not scared off by the prospect of having to fill in a bunch of information.

Tip #4: Avoid Captchas if Possible

Let’s get something clear right off the bat: website managers love captchas; users don’t! Nothing disrupts user experience like waiting for a captcha to load, solving it (sometimes several of them in a row), and waiting for it to confirm you’re not a bot. No one wants spam, but captchas aren’t as effective as you would think at avoiding it.

Captchas are supposed to be easy for humans and hard for bots. However, studies show that they’re becoming exceedingly challenging for humans, while AIs are improving at solving them. Today, captchas seem to be doing the opposite of what they’re supposed to, making things harder for humans and easier for bots. Therefore, adding a captcha to your contact submission process is simply not worth it. It’ll only make you lose valuable leads.

Tip #5: Show Off Your Team

Add photos of your team members to put a face behind the name and build trust with potential members. Is there someone in particular that handles customer inquiries in your company? Then, show that person’s name and face, so visitors know who they’re writing to when submitting a form. Adding this simple human touch can make a big difference in conversions.

Tip #6: Add Social Proof

It goes without saying how effective social proof is for marketing and conversion optimization. If you can show that your coworking space is popular and in demand, people will be more likely to want to join.

There are several ways to do this, but one of the most effective is adding testimonials from current or past members. These could be in the form of written testimonials, videos, and more. If you have many testimonials to choose from, add only those that tell how booking a tour was the best decision to make or how, after the tour, they were sure that that was the coworking space for them.

Tip #7: Optimize Your Contact Page and Contact Form for Mobile

We all know that younger generations are increasingly using their smartphones as their primary (and sometimes only) means of accessing the internet. This trend is especially true when making reservations and bookings online.

Therefore, if you want to optimize your contact page for conversion, you must make sure that both the page and the form are mobile-friendly. This means they should be responsive (adapt to any screen size) and easy to use on a small screen.

Tip #8: Add a FAQ Section

An FAQ section is always a great idea, regardless of what kind of website you’re running. An FAQ can be especially useful for a coworking space contact page because there are many common concerns and questions potential members usually have about these types of spaces. This solution lets you preemptively answer any objections they might have, increasing the likelihood that they’ll book a tour.

Tip #9: Throw in a Chatbot to Answer Questions That Aren’t in the FAQ

FAQs are great, but they can only answer so many questions. If you want to take things one step further, consider adding a chatbot to your contact page.

This way, you can offer potential members more help and support, increasing the chances that they’ll convert into actual paying customers. You can also ask visitors to share their contact information to get in touch with them directly and solve their concerns, but remember about their right to digital privacy and never disclose these details to other partners.

Tip #10: A/B Test Different Versions of Your Contact Page

Finally, no matter how well things should work in theory, many factors influence a visitor’s decision-making process besides the ones covered in these tips. A/B testing different versions of your contact page will give you the insight you need to know what works for your audience and what doesn’t. Try different headlines, copy, images, forms, CTAs, and so on, and see which version performs the best. Then, once you have a winner, implement that version on your live site.

The Bottom Line

These are just a few tips to help you optimize your coworking contact page for better conversion. By following these tips and driving traffic to your contact page through PPC ads or other means, you can be sure that your contact page will work as efficiently as possible to get more leads and conversions for your business.





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Why (& How) to Set Up Conversion Paths in Google Analytics (Successfully!)

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Why (& How) to Set Up Conversion Paths in Google Analytics (Successfully!)

Tracking your customer’s conversion paths helps you understand the journey your customers take before converting. Knowing this journey is critical as it shows you the areas to focus on to increase and accelerate conversions.

So what exactly are conversion paths and how do you track them? Keep reading to learn how to create successful conversion paths in Google Analytics so you can generate more leads and sales.

Table of contents

What is a conversion path in Google Analytics?

A conversion path is a series of actions a new website visitor takes before completing a desired action on your site, also known as a conversion. This action can be a form fill, a button click, a purchase, and more.

For example, suppose one of the goals on your website is to generate leads through an ebook. In that case, a conversion path will illustrate a connected channel of clicks that website visitors take to submit their contact information.

Here’s an illustration of some common conversion paths:

Image source

Conversion paths typically include a landing page, content offer, and a call to action button. You can also include thank you pages in your path.

Why are conversion paths important?

If you want to improve conversion on your website, you need to know what’s leading to those conversions. And since customers often take several actions before converting, it’s important to know the ins and outs of those behaviors.

Let’s dive deeper into some of the reasons why tracking conversion paths is so important for creating and maintaining a marketing action plan.

  • Know what’s working and what’s not. Knowing the behavioral paths of your leads and customers helps you to identify which campaigns and touchpoints are working so you can focus your budget and resources accordingly. For instance, you may notice that more of your users’ conversion paths start from PPC ads than your social ads so you can allocate more budget to PPC to boost your sales.
  • Identify bottlenecks in your funnel. Conversion paths help you to see where there are leaks in your funnel. For instance, you can see if there’s a drop-off for a particular offer, perhaps due to a bug, a tracking issue, or because an improvement is needed (such as to be more mobile-friendly, to have fewer fields, etc.)
  • Better understand your audience. You can also get insights into factors like location, income status, and gender to get a better feel for your target audience. For instance, you may notice a high cart abandonment rate among users in a particular location. You can look to see if the issue is a lack of localized payment methods, which you can improve on to better customer experience and boost conversion rates as a result.
  • Simplify campaign reporting. Finally, clear conversion paths allow you to easily gather metrics across channels, which helps you analyze your cross-channel marketing performance more accurately and boost your ROI.

How to set up conversion paths in Google Analytics

Now that you know the importance of conversion paths, it’s time to dive into how to set them up successfully in Google Ads and Google Analytics.

1. Set up your conversion tracking

To make use of conversion paths in Google Analytics, you of course need to establish what your conversions are. Depending on what marketing strategies you’re using, you can do this through Google Ads conversion tracking and/or through Google Analytics goal setup.

In Google Ads:

  • Go to Tools and settings > Measurement > Conversions
  • Click on +New Conversion Action.
  • Click on the Website
  • Input your website’s URL
  • Click on Scan

google ads conversion tracking setup

Next, you’ll set up your Google Tag, as shown below, then input the tag name and select the destination accounts.

conversion paths - google ads google tag

Set up your goals

You’ll also need to set up goals in Google Analytics. With GA4, this setup will be different, but for now, here’s what it looks like in Universal Analytics.

Click Admin on the bottom left corner.

Click on Goals

google analytics conversion path goals

After that, click on the custom option to set a new goal and add your goal description and details. Your description entails a name and goal type, as shown below.

google analytics conversion paths goal setup

Though there are four key types of Google Analytics goals you can choose from, your desired conversion action will determine your goal type.

  • Duration: These track how long users stay on your site before leaving, which you can use to track engagement.
  • Destination: These goals track when a particular page loads on your site as a way to track a conversion. For example the thank you page that triggers after an email newsletter signup or a thank you for your order page.
  • Pages per visit: These goals track the number of pages web visitors navigate before leaving your site—which can also be a helpful SEO metric.
  • Events: These goals track user interactions that Google does not typically record, like PDF downloads, button clicks, outbound link clicks, or even downloading a pricing quote for businesses like VoIP service providers.

After filling in your goal details, click on the value button to set your goal’s monetary value (we show you how to set conversion values here). Click “verify” and save.

Set up an attribution project

To use the conversion path report in Google Analytics, you must first create an Attribution project. Go to Explore> Conversion Paths, and then follow the prompts to set up your project.

google analytics new attribution project

Once you have your project set up, you can now create a conversion segment.

Create a conversion segment

Go to Conversions » Multi-Channel Funnels » Top Conversion Paths. Then click on Conversion Segments.
conversion paths google analytics - top conversion paths

Click on Create New Conversion Segment. The new segment can define your users from a particular geographic location, who buy a particular line of products, etc.

Define and name the new conversion segment. This ensures that your Google Analytics and your Data Studio show the same reports.

Click Apply then Save

Doing this will create a new conversion segment and also apply the segment to your conversion path report.

Now you’re ready to go!

Understanding the Top Conversion Paths report

With your conversion paths set up, you can now use the Multi-Channel Funnels report in Google Analytics to better understand your marketing attribution. This report will show you which channels contributed to a conversion on your site, such as organic, direct, paid, referral, and more.

To view these paths, go to Conversions » Multi-Channel Funnels » Top Conversion Paths
google analytics top conversion paths report

Pro tip: Set the date range to the last three months. Remember, the time lag to conversion can run into days or weeks, so set your date range for at least the last three months. This is also often enough time to gain actionable data.

Understanding the Assisted Conversions report

Within the same tab in Google Analytics is another attribution modeling tool called the Assisted Conversions report.  Assisted conversions for a given channel are all the channels that assisted or led to conversion but weren’t the final interaction.

For instance, say a user scans a QR code for app download but decides not to download the app immediately. Later, they download the app through a link on your social media. While the social link tap is considered the last-click conversion, your QR code played the assisted conversion role which may not be accounted for by the conversion metrics.

The flowchart below illustrates assisted interactions further.

google analytics assisted conversions

Image source

It’s important that you understand assisted conversions to identify marketing channels that introduce customers to your product. Then you can tailor your marketing strategies to ensure you attract quality leads from these channels and boost your conversion rates.

By understanding assisted conversions, you can also attribute values to paths and clicks in the line that made way for the final conversion, such as referral links, ads, etc., as shown in the report below.

google analytics assisted conversions report

Doing this not only helps you understand the role of various assisted conversion channels but also goes beyond the last-click conversion to provide a clear picture of your campaign performance and the general customer journey.

Get your conversion paths set up today

Conversion paths in Google Analytics enable you to track user activity on your site and analyze your campaign’s performance, giving you insight into the best performing marketing channels. These insights then help you to allocate your resources accordingly and identify optimizations to boost your conversion rates.

About the author

David Pagotto is the Founder and Managing Director of SIXGUN, a digital marketing agency based in Melbourne. He has been involved in digital marketing for over 10 years, helping organizations get more customers, more reach, and more impact.

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9 Non-PPC Questions Your PPC Clients Will Ask (& How to Answer Them)

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9 Non-PPC Questions Your PPC Clients Will Ask (& How to Answer Them)

A couple of months ago I wrote a post about things I wish I had known when I started my career in PPC. There was….quite a lot and one of the areas I covered was that of being a surprise business consultant in addition to a PPC consultant.

When a client asks you a question that has nothing to do with PPC…

It seemed like an area that other PPCers have experienced as well. So I thought it might be a good idea to dive deeper into this topic, discuss some of the most common (and sometimes most difficult) questions I’m asked by clients about their business and then also provide insights on how I go about answering them.

9 non-PPC questions your clients will ask (+ answers)

Here’s a list of nine common questions I’m asked as a PPC pro that I wanted to share my typical answers to.

Note: None of these answers are perfect. They’re simply what I’ve found works best for the clients I work with over time and keep us moving forward.

1. What should our budget be?

This is a topic that’s becoming more prevalent as my time goes on. It used to be that only small businesses would ask me what they should be spending on their ads, but more and more, I’m hearing larger companies ask similar questions. Luckily, this one is a little easier to answer with the help of some of the platform planning tools.

google keyword planner

The Google Keyword Planner, for example, is a keyword research tool with built-in functionality for you to estimate overall costs of your potential keywords and geographic area. And when you create audiences on LinkedIn, there are size estimates and CPCs estimated based on your parameters that give you a range of what you could spend. There’s also a budget report in Google Ads that can help you see your current and projected spend based on your daily budget.

These tools are best used as guideposts. Typically, I use these numbers as a suggested range to get the conversation moving, but they’re just starting points. I have never taken the suggested spend from these tools and told my clients that’s what the budget HAS to be. That’s simply not practical. Sometimes the estimated spend is too small, other times it’s too large.

The other consideration aside from potential is realistic performance expectations. Often, clients will have a target number of leads or amount of revenue they would like their campaigns to produce. I work with them to create realistic CPA or ROAS goals, then reverse engineer the appropriate budget from there.

For example, if you want to generate 100 leads per month and your realistic CPL target is $200, you’ll need to have at least a budget of $20k per month to hit those goals. Anything short of that simply isn’t realistic.

2. Who should we be targeting?

I always tell my clients that you know your business, we know the ad channels. When someone asks me who they should be targeting, I turn the question back on them.

Who is your target audience?

Give me a persona. How old are they? Where do they live? What types of companies do they work in? What do they do on the weekends?

Maybe not all of these types of questions will feed into every business type, but the more information we have, the better off we are.

No matter what they tell me, I take those characteristics and conduct targeting research on the ad channels. Can I find any of these characteristics on LinkedIn? Snapchat? Google? Facebook?

facebook ad targeting settings

Depending on what I find, my response to them is usually a rundown of targeting options on a number of channels that we then use as the starting point to develop a multi-channel or cross-channel approach to customer generation.

3. Who are our competitors and how can we differentiate from them?

Competitors in PPC are not always the same as regular market competition. Typically when my clients ask me this question, they’re asking for their market competitors. But that’s not where my value lies.

Instead, I discuss what makes a PPC competitor. These are companies that you’re directly bidding against for the attention and clicks of your target customer.

On search, this could be a number of brands that sell the same products/services that you do, or they could be folks who are in the wrong place. Depending on who you find in these areas, you need to craft your advertising accordingly. I use a couple of tools to help identify these competitors.

First, if there are already search campaigns running, I use the Auction Insights tool. The domains that show up here are bidding against you on a regular basis. In some cases, this can give you a good list of folks to do further research on and in some cases, it can also cause you to revisit your keyword list if you find that many of the brands listed aren’t relevant to your company.

spyfu competitor analysis example

Image source

Second, I use the competitor keyword tools like SpyFu, SEMRush, and iSpionage. While they’re not perfect, these tools can help identify the keywords certain brands are bidding on and give you more ideas of keywords to target and stay away from based on competition.

No matter what the list of competitors, I usually try and provide a report that includes insights on keywords, ad copy, calls to action, and landing page insights for the main 5-10 competitors to give my clients a good idea what they’re realistically up against in the SERPs.

4. Should we focus on growing our customer base or servicing the customers we already have?

There’s not really a right or wrong answer here, but I usually ask about customer churn. If you’re losing customers faster than you can make them, you should likely work on retaining the customers you have before you go find more. Otherwise, you’re just going to lose them down the line.

leading causes of customer churn

Image source

That said, it can be very short-sighted to only look at existing customers when running a business. If you’re not influencing new users, you’re not building a pipeline for future customers.

Even if you need to work on retention, I’ll have a hard time saying you shouldn’t do ANY prospecting. If you don’t, you likely won’t have a place to go for users once that retention strategy is in place.

5. Should we expand into new geographic markets?

I love when companies want to expand, but you need to make sure it’s worth it.

The first place I usually look is demand: is there search volume or high enough target audiences to support expanded coverage for their services? Ideally, I can find some benchmark stats for performance, but typically that information is pretty scarce.

The next thing to do is check the business fundamentals.

  • Do your shipping costs go up?
  • Can you keep your service timing promises?
  • Can you support a dispersed customer base and maintain your level of service?
  • Could you keep up with increased production needs?
  • Are there other considerations that come into play with expanded coverage?

If all of these things align with green lights for the expanded coverage, I’ll suggest a controlled test. Target the audiences that have the highest performance from the current locations or are the best fit in the new ones and run a time and budget-restricted campaign.

The time and budget restrictions are important. You want to ensure your test has enough time for some optimizations and enough budget was spent to give this new area an honest chance to perform. Getting signoff on those pieces will be important to prove if this area is worthy of ongoing expansion.

ansoff matrix

Image source

6. Does it make sense to extend our product or service offerings?

Similar to geographic expansion, we PPC pros can help with this in a couple of ways:

Would there be existing demand for these new products/services or would we have to create it?

Are there other companies doing this already? How would we stack up against them, cost and quality-wise?

In some instances, I’ve found huge demand for a product or service, but my client wasn’t able to deliver at a level that beat the competition on either quality or cost. To unseat an existing company, you’ll likely have to beat them on one of these two. If you can’t do that, it might not be in your best interest to expand.

 

b2b vs b2c marketing - swot analysis template

Our SWOT analysis template could come in handy here.

7. Should we have a holiday sale this year or hold off?

Based on the brands I’ve worked with, holiday sales are usually designed to do a couple of things: meet annual revenue targets or acquire new customers at a lower cost with the expectation that they’ll come back later on. Typically, holiday sales are NOT meant to be the time of year when people rake in the highest ROAS performance.

happy socks black friday sale

When I’m asked this question, I usually ask what the main goals of having a sale would be. What are they trying to achieve? Work on coming up with estimates of performance during the holiday period to see if the goals they have are realistically achievable.

This can be done through some of the planning tools, but the best is to use historical performance if you have it. Take a look at the last couple of years during the holiday. How did things shift? How did they stay the same? Based on these trends, do you think their goals for this holiday season are achievable with a holiday sale or will they be undermining the campaigns?

8. What areas of our company do you think are resonating well and what could be done to improve?

In my experience, this question is nearly impossible to answer other than from a campaign perspective.

Likely, you don’t know how customers are liking their products or services, but you can get insights about which ad copy messages, calls to action, or keyword groups are receiving the most attention in the account, either volume or engagement wise to help give some guidance.

Take a look at the different components of your account. What campaigns/products/services are getting the most volume? Which have the highest CTR? Which have the highest conversion rate? What has the highest ROAS or the lowest CPA?

search ad benchmark data

View our latest online advertising benchmark data here.

Depending on what you find in the performance, you might be highlighting an area of their business that your client didn’t realize is a strong performer for them and give them a place to focus on expansion.

9. What are some brands you engage with regularly and what do you like about them? How could those same practices apply to our company?

Honestly, this one is a little tougher, because it’s pretty much all opinion based. For this question, I try to be on the lookout regularly to find brands that I like and are doing a good job achieving specific goals.

That said, it’s always a good idea to check out the ad libraries to see what types of ads high-spend brands are running and see if you can find some takeaways for your clients.

I personally like to look at the Facebook Ad Library and the TikTok Ads Inspiration section. Others like MOAT can help you find display ads companies are running.

tik tok ads inspiration center

No matter where you get the info, it’s always good to show actual examples of the ads rather than just talk about them. Clients love to see visuals to make a point and then they’re much easier to share with their own creative departments as direction for future campaigns.

Conclusion

Almost every PPC pro I’ve talked to over the years agrees: In some ways, we end up being an additional business consultant to our clients outside of our usual PPC duties. Hopefully, highlighting some of my answers to these questions, which you’ll find are usually research or process-based more than anything, will give you the confidence to take this extra role head-on and continue providing additional benefits to your clients.

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47 Creative February Marketing Ideas (Beyond Valentine’s Day!)

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50+ Creative February Marketing Ideas (Beyond Valentine’s Day!)

February is home to the most romantic holiday of the year:

Just kidding (shouldn’t that be in March anyway?). But there is so much more to February than Branch’s Conversation Hearts and #sharethelove. So today, I’m showering you with over 50 creative and February marketing ideas and examples to help you connect with customers and build your brand.

Table of contents

February awareness causes

Below is a list of awareness causes recognized in February that can help you with cause-related marketing.

  • American History Month
  • American Heart Month (heart disease)
  • Bake for Family Fun Month
  • Black History Month
  • Cancer Prevention Month
  • Children’s Dental Health Month
  • Embroidery Month
  • Free and Open-Source Software Month
  • Library Lover’s Month
  • Self-Check Month
  • Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month
  • Wedding Month

Some of these are general while others are highly specific, so depending on your business, your trade, or your niche, you may or may not be able to apply these to your February social media and marketing campaigns (National Embroidery Month isn’t exactly versatile, for example).

February national days

There’s a full list of February national days and dates at the bottom of this post, but here are some highlights:

  • Known: Groundhog Day, President’s Day, Valentine’s Day (Valentine’s Day marketing ideas here), Galentine’s Day.
  • Fun: Day the Music Died Day, Ice Cream for Breakfast Day, Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Day, Make a Friend Day, Do A Grouch a Favor Day, Comfy Day, Optimist Day.
  • Meaningful: Freedom Day, Girls and Women in Sports Day, Wear Red Day, Safer Internet Day, Random Acts of Kindness Day, Shut-In Visitation Day, Set a Good Example Day, Skip the Straw Day.
  • Industry-specific: Toothache Day, Dog Biscuit Day, Love Your Pet Day, Spay Day, Clean Out Your Computer Day, Caregivers Day, Lash Day, Home Warranty Day, Women Physicians Day.
  • Well alright: Public Sleeping Day.

sleep meme

February diversity, equity & inclusion

Alright, now it’s time to get into the marketing ideas. Let’s start with important dates and observances that can help you in your diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts.

  • Black History Month: Your Black History-related content should not actually be a marketing ploy but a genuine initiative to raise awareness and promote civil rights.february marketing ideas black history month
    Here are some things you can do.
    • Highlight prominent Black leaders in your industry—lawyers, politicians, scientists, artists, educators, and athletes who have shaped or are shaping American society or your industry.
    • Interview or feature Black business owners, influencers, or members of your community who are helping to make history.
    • Share quotes, little-known facts, and eye-opening stats about Black History—especially those related to your industry or niche.
  • Tammy Baldwin’s birthday (Feb 11): Tammy Baldwin is the first openly LGBT woman elected to both houses of Congress. Post an inspiring quote from her on Instagram or Facebook.
  • Susan B. Anthony’s birthday (Feb 15): This famous female is a leader of the women’s suffrage movement who advocated for abolition, labor rights, equal pay and more. On this day, share an eye-opening statistic or inspirational quote to raise awareness.

Meaningful February marketing ideas

In addition to inclusivity, there are plenty of other themes during February that can help you with meaningful marketing. Showing your support for causes you care about is a great way to connect with your audience and express your core values. Here are some ideas and examples.

Heart Health Awareness Month

So February isn’t all about that $1 pink balloon heart but also that invaluable organ inside of you that makes you tick. If your business is focused on health and wellness, this is a great marketing opportunity for you.

  • Fitness centers and gyms can partner with a local health center for heart disease awareness or screenings.
  • Host special classes focusing on cardiovascular activity.
  • Write informative blog posts about heart health and risk factors. Use this time to market your business by educating your customers on leading healthy lives.
  • Give out a free heart-healthy gift with purchases or registrations.

In the example below, this fitness center is giving out free heart rate monitors to those who join in the month of February.

february marketing ideas national heart month

If you’re not a health or fitness business, no problem.

  • Any business can sponsor a Healing Heart 5k, or donate a portion of their profits to a heart health-related nonprofit.
  • Think outside the box—pet hearts, artichoke hearts, hearts of remain, website health (the heart of a business marketing strategy, for example).

RELATED: 34 Genuine Valentine’s Day Messages and Email Templates to Send to Customers

Children’s Dental Health Month

Dentists can certainly have a field day with this one, but other businesses can use this opportunity to teach parents and students about the importance of dental health.

  • Daycares, fitness centers, and churches can host special classes about the importance of dental hygiene.
  • If you’re a dentist, you may offer to teach such classes. Or spruce up your dentist website with some extra decorations or promotions.
  • Ecommerce businesses can promote their oral hygiene products.
  • If you’re not a dentist, a simple social media post to bring your target audience’s attention to the cause can go a long way.

Cancer Awareness Month

In addition to having World Cancer Day, the whole month of February is dedicated to cancer awareness. Show your support on Facebook with a purple-themed post or initiative. You can encourage your followers to “purple” their profile, promote your purple products, or run a purple-themed contest.

february marketing ideas purple your profile

Wear Red Day

National Wear Red Day is focused on raising awareness for heart disease. On this day, you could:

  • Host an event in support of cardiovascular health and promote it on Instagram.
  • Promote your red products or give your social media profiles or homepage a red theme for the day.
  • Post an applicable picture to Instagram with an eye-opening stat. This is a great way to increase Instagram engagement.
february marketing ideas wear red day 1

World Cancer Day

You may also want to run a special promotion on World Cancer Day itself, especially if you’re in the health and fitness industry.

february facebook ideas world cancer day

Fun February marketing ideas

Some of these are well-known, others not so much. Take a look and see which ones align with your brand voice and values.

Presidents Day

Federal holidays like these are always versatile. Any industry can run a Presidents Day sale—for the day, the weekend, or the whole dang month. Here are some ideas:

  • Run a presidential trivia night at your restaurant or even on social media.
  • Run a Presidents Day giveaway on Instagram or Facebook.
  • Create a Facebook event for your sale.
february marketing ideas - presidents day facebook event

Ice Cream for Breakfast Day

Ironically, in the middle of Children’s Dental Health Month is Ice Cream for Breakfast Day…oops? But who says you can’t use this quirky holiday to market your business?

Held on the first Saturday of February, this is an opportunity for bakeries, ice cream shops, or restaurants to run special promotions.

february marketing ideas ice cream for breakfast day

If you’re not in the confectionery industry, here are some other ideas:

  • Let your local social media followers know where they can celebrate the day.
  • Host a virtual ice cream for breakfast party.
  • Ask your followers to share their ice cream sundaes.

Mardi Gras

Fat (mardi) Tuesday (Gras) is held on the last Tuesday before Ash Wednesday every year. It’s a celebration of life before the more somber Ash Wednesday and following period of Lent. Here are some Mardi Gras marketing ideas:

  • Write a blog post with a “celebration of life” theme.
  • Promote your purple, green, and gold products.
  • Run a Mardi Gras Instagram giveaway.
  • Enter customers on that day into a drawing for a gift card or discount.
  • Offer a discount to those who wear Mardi Gras beads to your store, event, or classes. Promote the sale ahead of time with a post and encourage followers throughout the day by posting pictures of customers wearing their beads.
february marketing ideas mardi gras bead discount

Love Your Pet Day

Love Your Pet Day is February’s opportunity for you to shamelessly post about your pet. But here are some additional ideas to consider:

  • Write a blog post about what your pet can teach you about [topic relevant to your industry].
  • Have your employees share photos of their pets and put the montage on social media or in your February newsletter.
  • Come up with a pet-themed incentive. For example, Select Hotels invited its followers to comment on its post with their favorite moments with their pets, and that if they did, “A surprise awaits the two of you on your next visit.”
february marketing ideas love your pet day giveaway

Make a Friend Day

This day gives you lots of opportunities for creative marketing.

  • Send out a review request email themed around asking your customers to be your friend. (Use these February email subjet lines for inspiration!)
  • Partner with a neighboring or complementary business and run a joint friends promotion.
  • Remind people of your referral program or run a one-day special where referrals result in a discount or gift.
february marketing ideas refer a friend

Groundhog Day Contest

This superstitious day happens on February 2 every year. For the uninitiated, if the groundhog sees its shadow, winter will last six more weeks. If it does not see its shadow, spring will arrive early. Plenty of fun marketing material to work with here.

  • Run a sale where the offer is contingent upon the outcome of the day.
  • Create content inspired by the Groundhog Day movie, sharing tips to break up the monotony or avoid repeating mistakes.
  • On Groundhog Day, you can run a contest, share a question or poll with your audience, or simply share a fun fact about the day.
february marketing ideas groundhog day

Super Bowl

The Super Bowl is one of the most watched programs on television. How does your target audience relate to football? Are they football fans? Spouses or parents of football fans? Athletes? Is your business located near a Superbowl venue? Run a special during Superbowl weekend, create Superbowl-themed products, or share a helpful tip relevant to what their Superbowl experience will be like.

february marketing ideas super bowl promotions

February hashtag marketing ideas

Hashtags can expand your reach and add some personality to your posts. Here are some basic February hashtags to play around with.

#Febsale

If you’re just getting started with your Instagram marketing, start basic with something as simple as a #Febsale. In the below example, the small business Mexicali took a snapshot of their ready-to-ship orders to promote their February sale and encourage people to buy.

They didn’t use a photo shoot or fancy Photoshop graphics; just a simple behind-the-scenes sneak peek and a caption that closes with a question.

february marketing ideas febsale

#FebruaryFeels for mood

You don’t need to have a sale for a February-friendly Instagram post. How about just appealing to your audience’s mood during this time of year?

february marketing ideas febuary feels

Just make sure you’re appealing to the mood of your specific audience in February as it relates to your business. Is your audience…

  • Filing tax forms?
  • Returning back to school after break?
  • Reading love stories and seeking positive vibes?
  • Totally embracing singledom?

#FebruaryFeels for a testimonial

Look back through your photos or even user-generated content. Can you repurpose any of them for a #FebruaryFeels-inspired testimonial, as the Australian Girls Choir does below?

february marketing ideas febuary feels testimonial

#FebruaryFavorites to promote other content

This is a good way to surface seasonal content or products or even to bring to light some of the forgotten ones. Share a roundup of your most popular products or services, or even your favorite tips, tools, products, or resources related to your audience’s goals and needs.

february marketing ideas february favorites content

#FebruaryFeature to promote products

Whether the product you’re promoting is February-themed or not, you can make it so by using the hashtag #Februaryfeature. Pick something you’d like to promote in February and see if #Februaryfeature can help increase sales and engagement related to it.

february marketing ideas february feature

#FebruaryFeature to feature an employee

You could also feature an employee, student, or customer. These types of feature posts can get your employees, customers, and fans excited about your business. Plus, they’ll want to share their “celebrity” post with their network, which can help increase your reach.

february marketing ideas february feature employee

#FreshStartFebruary

Another theme you can take advantage of in your February Instagram marketing is #FreshStartFebruary. This is especially applicable for businesses in the health and wellness industry.

february marketing ideas fresh start february1

As you can see, there is much more to February than Valentine’s Day (but we have plenty of Valentine’s Day marketing ideas here). Use the ideas above for creative and quality engagement with your audience—the best way to market your business. And don’t forget about March! If you have events or promotions planned for Saint Patrick’s Day or other holidays, get your audience in the know.

For more monthly marketing ideas, here’s our full list:

P.S. For marketing ideas for the whole year, check out LocaliQ’s always-updated marketing calendar.

Full list of February national days & dates

Thanks, as always, to National Day Calendar.

February 1

  • Baked Alaska Day
  • Dark Chocolate Day
  • Freedom Day (Freedom From Slavery)
  • Get Up Day
  • Serpent Day
  • Texas Day

February 2

  • Heavenly Hash Day
  • Tater Tot Day
  • Groundhog Day
  • Girls and Women in Sports Day – Changes Annually

February 3

  • Carrot Cake Day
  • Day the Music Died Day
  • Missing Persons Day
  • Women Physicians Day
  • Optimist Day – First Thursday in February

February 4

  • Create a Vacuum day
  • Hemp Day
  • Homemade Soup Day
  • Thank a Mail Carrier Day
  • Wear Red Day – First Friday in February
  • Bubble Gum Day – First Friday in February

February 5

  • Weatherperson’s Day
  • World Nutella Day
  • Ice Cream for Breakfast Day – First Saturday in February
  • Play Outside Day – First Saturday of Every Month

February 6

  • Frozen Yogurt Day
  • Lame Duck Day
  • Chopsticks Day

February 7

  • Fettuccine Alfredo Day
  • Periodic Table Day
  • Send a Card to a Friend Day

February 8

  • Boy Scouts Day
  • Kite Flying Day
  • Iowa Day
  • Safer Internet Day U.S. – changes annually

February 9

  • Cut the Cord Day
  • Bagel and Lox Day
  • Pizza Day
  • Toothache Day

February 10

  • Cream Cheese Brownie Day
  • Home Warranty Day
  • Umbrella Day
  • Giving Hearts Day – Second Thursday in February

February 11

  • Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Day
  • Inventors’ Day
  • Make a Friend Day
  • Peppermint Patty Day
  • Shut-In Visitation Day
  • White Shirt Day

February 12

  • Plum Pudding Day
  • Global Movie Day – Second Saturday in February

February 13

  • Galentine’s Day
  • Cheddar Day
  • Tortellini Day
  • Pork Rind Day – Day of the Big Game

February 14

  • Cream-Filled Chocolates Day
  • Ferris Wheel Day
  • Organ Donor Day
  • Valentine’s Day
  • Football Hangover Day – day after the Superbowl
  • Clean Out Your Computer Day – Second Monday

February 15

  • Gumdrop Day
  • Singles Awareness Day
  • Wisconsin Day

February 16

  • Almond Day
  • Do A Grouch a Favor Day
  • Pancake Day (IHOP) – changes annually

February 17

  • Random Acts of Kindness Day
  • Cabbage Day

February 18

  • Battery Day
  • Crab Stuffed Flounder Day
  • Drink Wine Day
  • No One Eats Alone Day – Changes annually
  • Caregivers Day – Third Friday

February 19

  • Arabian Horse Day *
  • Red Sock Day * – Third Saturday in February
  • Chocolate Mint Day
  • Lash Day
  • Vet Girls RISE Day

February 20

  • Comfy Day
  • Cherry Pie Day
  • Love Your Pet Day
  • Muffin Day

February 21

  • Grain-Free Day
  • Sticky Bun Day
  • Presidents Day – Third Monday

February 22

  • Supermarket Employee Day *
  • California Day
  • Cook a Sweet Potato Day
  • Margarita Day
  • World Spay Day – Last Tuesday in February

February 23

  • Banana Bread Day
  • Dog Biscuit Day
  • Tile Day

February 24

  • Tortilla Chip Day
  • Toast Day – Last Thursday
  • Chili Day – Fourth Thursday

February 25

  • Chocolate Covered Nut Day
  • Clam Chowder Day
  • Skip the Straw Day – Fourth Friday

February 26

  • Set a Good Example Day *
  • Pistachio Day
  • Tell a Fairy Tale Day

February 27

  • Anosmia Awareness Day
  • Kahlua Day
  • Retro Day
  • Strawberry Day
  • Polar Bear Day

February 28

  • Chocolate Souffle Day
  • Floral Design Day
  • Public Sleeping Day
  • Tooth Fairy Day
  • Rare Disease Day USA – Last Day in February

February 29 (Every Four Years)

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