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Google On Percentage That Represents Duplicate Content

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Google On Percentage That Represents Duplicate Content

Google’s John Mueller recently answered a question of whether there’s a percentage threshold of content duplication that Google uses to identify and filter out duplicate content.

What Percentage Equals Duplicate Content?

The conversation actually started on Facebook when Duane Forrester (@DuaneForrester) asked if anyone knew if any search engine has published a percentage of content overlap at which content is considered duplicate.

Bill Hartzer (bhartzer) turned to Twitter to ask John Mueller and received a near immediate response.

Bill tweeted:

Google’s John Mueller responded:

How Does Google Detect Duplicate Content?

Google’s methodology for detecting duplicate content has remained remarkably similar for many years.

Back in 2013, Matt Cutts (@mattcutts), a software engineer at the time at Google published an official Google video describing how Google detects duplicate content.

He started the video by stating that a great deal of Internet content is duplicate and that it’s a normal thing to happen.

“It’s important ot realize that if you look at content on the web, something like 25% or 30% of all the web’s content is duplicate content.

…People will quote a paragraph of a blog and then link to the blog, that sort of thing.”

He went on to say that because so much of duplicate content is innocent and without spammy intent that Google won’t penalize that content.

Penalizing webpages for having some duplicate content, he said, would have a negative effect on the quality of the search results.

What Google does when it finds duplicate content is:

“…try to group it all together and treat it as if it’s just one piece of content.”

Matt continued:

“It’s just treated as something that we need to cluster appropriately. And we need to make sure that it ranks correctly.”

He explained that Google then chooses which page to show in the search results and that it filters out the duplicate pages in order to improve the user experience.

How Google Handles Duplicate Content – 2020 Version

Fast forward to 2020 and Google published a Search Off the Record podcast episode where the same topic is described in remarkably similar language.

Here is the relevant section of that podcast from the 06:44 minutes into the episode:

“Gary Illyes: And now we ended up with the next step, which is actually canonicalization and dupe detection.

Martin Splitt: Isn’t that the same, dupe detection and canonicalization, kind of?

Gary Illyes: [00:06:56] Well, it’s not, right? Because first you have to detect the dupes, basically cluster them together, saying that all of these pages are dupes of each other,
and then you have to basically find a leader page for all of them.

…And that is canonicalization.

So, you have the duplication, which is the whole term, but within that you have cluster building, like dupe cluster building, and canonicalization. “

Gary next explains in technical terms how exactly they do this. Basically, Google isn’t really looking at percentages exactly, but rather comparing checksums.

A checksum can be said to be a representation of content as a series of numbers or letters. So if the content is duplicate then the checksum number sequence will be similar.

This is how Gary explained it:

“So, for dupe detection what we do is, well, we try to detect dupes.

And how we do that is perhaps how most people at other search engines do it, which is, basically, reducing the content into a hash or checksum and then comparing the checksums.”

Gary said Google does it that way because it’s easier (and obviously accurate).

Google Detects Duplicate Content with Checksums

So when talking about duplicate content it’s probably not a matter of a threshold of percentage, where there’s a number at which content is said to be duplicate.

But rather, duplicate content is detected with a representation of the content in the form of a checksum and then those checksums are compared.

An additional takeaway is that there appears to be a distinction between when part of the content is duplicate and all of the content is duplicate.


Featured image by Shutterstock/Ezume Images

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LinkedIn Newsletters: What I’ve Learned (So Far)

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LinkedIn Newsletters: What I've Learned (So Far)

Four weeks ago, I launched my LinkedIn newsletter called The Well-Branded Woman.

It’s been a freaky, fun-filled ride, complete with unexpected twists and turns. What I thought was going to happen didn’t – and what did happen blew my mind.

Here’s what I did and what I’ve learned (so far!).

Here’s how I set up my first LinkedIn newsletter:

 

I used market research to build excitement.

A week and a half before I launched my newsletter, I created a LinkedIn poll telling people about my new newsletter focus (Gen X and Millennial women) and asking what I should name it.

I wanted to ensure the name would “click” with my target reader. Plus, I wanted to build awareness that I’d be launching a newsletter soon.

If I were to do it again, I would have allowed at least two weeks for this process – maybe a bit more. It worked out because I had some strong newsletter names to test – but the timeline would have been too short if I had started from scratch.

I created attention-grabbing graphics for the newsletter.

My midlife-aged readers would want to know that I was in their age group, so my wonderfully talented designer created a bright orange featured image template with my photo front and center. I wanted a color and design that popped off the page — plus LinkedIn says that images with faces “resonate more with audiences.”

Graphics in hand, I was ready to write my first article where…

I immediately dropped multiple actionable tips in my first LinkedIn newsletter article.

My first article was about how Gen X and Millennial women can transform themselves into online thought leaders. I purposely wrote a very long, informative piece that shared tips I didn’t see anywhere else and were specific to my audience.

I also wove in personal information to help the reader get to know me.

The final article was over 1,800 words – way longer than I had planned. I was curious if anyone would read all those words, but I knew the article provided solid, actionable information.

I also invited women to connect with me and to DM me.

What are my LinkedIn newsletter results (so far?)

 

  • By the end of the first day after publication, I had 163 subscribers. I was so happy! LinkedIn automatically sends subscribers an email as soon as I publish a newsletter, so I reach these readers directly.
  • By that following Monday, I had over four hundred subscribers. I was even happier!
  • And then, a LinkedIn editor found my article and promoted it on the home feed. All of a sudden, my LinkedIn DMs blew up. Women read my article and vibed with my message. Responding to everyone took more than eight hours, spread over two days. It was amazing!
  • Since then, the article has been viewed over 100,000 times and has received over 1,000 likes and over 130 comments. And yes, I responded to all of those comments. Why?
  • It’s not enough to simply post on LinkedIn and call it good. If you want to build a community, that means engaging with your audience right after they post and helping them feel seen. By doing so, I was able to start some fantastic conversations with women who would never have opened up to me any other way.

Today, the newsletter has almost 1,700 subscribers. And yes, that first article is positioning!

My LinkedIn newsletter future feels bright.

What I’m (still) learning about LinkedIn newsletters:

 

  • I’ve created SEO writing articles for so long that I naturally thought that’s what this audience would want to learn from me. It was a delightful surprise to know my new audience is looking for personal branding tips and how to future-proof their careers.
  • I had to throw my editorial calendar out the window, but I’m okay with that. I’m creating articles on the fly as I read the comments and get a sense of what women what to know.
  • I’m still figuring out how to monetize. Right now, creating the newsletter costs me time and money. Would I like to make money from it? Yes, but the time isn’t right. I don’t quite know what the audience needs. I’d rather listen and wait.

I’m playing the long game.

Would I recommend LinkedIn newsletters for other B2B consultants or companies? Yes. It’s turning out to be a powerful content tactic. Overwhelming, but powerful.

Plus, if you’re a freelancer, you could sell LinkedIn newsletter creation and maintenance services. Many B2B companies are new to LinkedIn newsletters, so knowing how to plan and write them could open up a new profit center. Especially if you work with thought leaders and consultants who need branding — but don’t have time to write.

My take: LinkedIn newsletters get a thumbs up.

I’ll keep you posted on my progress.

What do you think?

Are you considering trying LinkedIn newsletters (or suggesting them to your client)? Leave a comment and let me know. 

Oh, and if you want to know how your hero’s journey can help you build your personal brand, check out my latest Charisma Boost post.

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