Ta kontakt med oss

MARKNADSFÖRING

Hur planering att misslyckas kan lyckas [rosafärgade glasögon]

Publicerad

How Planning To Fail Can Succeed [Rose-Colored Glasses]


An interesting question came up recently in a marketing group I follow on social media: “What content should we create?”

The first few comments on the post were what you might suspect. Some people encouraged the poster to interview people who fit their personas to find out what they struggle with. Others talked about getting over writer’s block. A few suggested they list every question their potential customers might have and write posts about that.

The original poster responded by acknowledging the value of these responses but clarified the question. They weren’t asking what they should write that would resonate with their target audiences. They were looking for content ideas that would drive the most reactions. Full stop.

They wanted to create controversy, provocation, and a level of virality. The theory: Do something that makes a lot of noise and inspires a boatload of people to react, then the right people will pay attention to your other content that focuses on the things you do.

Predictably, the tone of the discussion shifted into a fiery debate of the flawed notion (if not ethics) of that theory. Let’s save that discussion for a different day.

But it got me thinking. Is there a case where it makes sense to deliberately put out content you don’t like, agree with, or approve of – with the explicit goal of failing?

My answer is yes.

Is there a case where you should publish #content with the explicit goal of failing? Yes, says @Robert_Rose via @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

Why intentionally failing can be a good thing

We all know failing can be a productive result. There are entire books written on how people tend to learn more from failures than successes.

But this concept almost always gets covered in the context of failing when trying to succeed. In other words, you do your level best to accomplish something – and something in that approach failed. The lesson is that you should have done something differently.

I’m interested in what happens when you deliberately try to fail or at least try something the world deems incorrect. You either confirm what you expected or get surprised by the results.

Of course, some activities lend themselves better to this approach than others. For example, I wouldn’t try to fail while learning to fly an airplane. However, in marketing – and especially content – this approach gives you an invaluable opportunity to expand your toolkit.

According to the book Brilliant Mistakes by Paul Schoemaker, reklam- icon David Ogilvy made deliberate mistakes frequently. He would run ads that he and the client team had rejected just to test their collective thinking. Most would fail. But a few, including the iconic eye patch Hathaway shirt ad – would become legendary campaigns.

Think about making time, money, or content available to test your core instincts. I don’t mean running a simple A/B test to evaluate two good efforts. That only determines which one resonates better.

I’m suggesting that you try a content piece that poses an idea you flat-out rejected. Or try investing in a channel that from every angle seems to be wrong. For example, later this month, I’m going to try TikTok. I’m 99.9% sure I will fail spectacularly.

What if you invest in a channel that from every angle seems wrong? Soon, @Robert_Rose will try on #TikTok via @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

But what if I’m wrong?

There’s a famous quote attributed to IBM founder Thomas J. Watson: "If you want to increase your success rate, double your failure rate.” It seems to me there’s only one mathematical way to double your failure rate – and that’s if you occasionally deliberately try to fail.

How to fail on purpose

A friend and I had a funny saying we used to tell each other whenever we failed a test at school. We’d say, “I’d rather get a zero than a 59.”

Why? Because getting 59 means we tried and still failed.

Of course, we weren’t saying no one should ever try. We were being silly teenagers.

In content marketing, we know the value of tests and experimentation. However, most testing is done to confirm an initial assumption. In fact, a core piece of an A/B test is to form a hypothesis first. You have a suspected or proven winner, and you test an alternative version to see if it performs better.

Making a deliberate mistake is a bit different. In these are experiments, you assume you’re going to fail.

What could be the value of doing that?

Well, there can be two valuable outcomes. One is that you confirm your assumption of failure and learn something. The other is that you succeed (in other words, you fail at failing) and that long-shot effort might pay off handsomely. Even if it doesn’t, you’ve learned something.

If you make a deliberate mistake and succeed, you not only learn something, but the takeaway could pay off handsomely, says @Robert_Rose via @CMIContent. #ContentMarketing Klicka för att tweeta

There are different flavors of deliberate mistakes. One of my favorites was made by a vice president of marketing at a big B2B company. Over the years, they had accumulated tens of thousands of subscribers to their email newsletter. Every week they would dutifully email almost 90,000 newsletters, and every week, the engagement rates were extremely low.

So, the vice president did something interesting. He sent a large segment of the subscribed but disengaged audience an email with the subject line: Sorry to See You Go.

In the body of the email, the copy told the recipient the company was sorry they’d unsubscribed from the newsletter. But, the text continued, if they thought this unsubscribe might be in error, they could respond by clicking through to a survey.

This move was clearly a deliberate mistake. Certainly most, if not all, of these subscribers wouldn’t engage with the email. But their marketing team decided it was worth making the mistake and risk losing 30,000-plus subscribers to see if they had any shot with this unengaged audience.

The result? About 60% never responded or clicked and got officially unsubscribed from the newsletter. But 40% clicked and responded, “No, this was a mistake.” They hadn’t unsubscribed. For a while, this email had the highest click-through rate.

One other surprising result? Among those who responded, about 10% indicated they were interested in subscribing to a different topic addressed by the company.

The vice president of marketing told me, “We learned a lot from that ‘mistake.’”

There are a few key moments when deliberate mistakes might make sense for your content marketing:

1. There’s less to lose

Obviously, risk plays a role in how big a mistake you should deliberately make. Skydiving, for example, isn’t the best activity where an intentional mistake is likely to pay off. You don’t want to publish a content piece completely off-brand, run afoul of legal or compliance issues, or really offend your audience. But like the vice president of marketing at that B2B company. What could they lose other than a third of the email database that wasn’t engaging anyway?

2. Rigid, institutional rules

When you intentionally make a mistake, it will more likely go your way when the mistake goes against an institutional rule or rigid, outdated convention. A great example of this is the marketing for the movie Deadpool. It was, by most counts, a campaign filled with deliberate mistakes. Perhaps the biggest was its outdoor billboard campaign with a pictogram of a skull, a poop emoji, and the letter “L” with the premiere date. Adweek called the campaign “so stupid, it’s genius.”

Billboard containing a skull, poop emoji, and letter L.

How about that rule that says never publish blog posts on the weekend? Everybody says it doesn’t work, and publishing on those days is a mistake. Why not make that “mistake” and see what happens?

3. You are the newbie

An optimal time to make a deliberate mistake is when you’re new to a particular problem or challenge. It’s when your audience, customers, or colleagues are most likely to forgive your mistake – and then, of course, you can refer to the first moment above.

One of my good friends has been the CMO of several startup companies. He told me that when he joins a new company, he goes on a “listening tour” to hear from the practitioners. He often introduces a marketing newbie mistake into the conversation to see if a practitioner will push back, correct it, or just go with the flow. Certainly, he risks coming across as inexperienced. But, he says, what’s more important is that they start on equal footing, and he can start a dialogue with his new colleague.

Failing to fail to fail

Of course, not every deliberate mistake will end up with a successful outcome. Sometimes, after all, a mistake is a mistake – and deliberately making it will get you exactly what you asked for.

There is only one thing that’s assured: If you only fail when we’re trying not to, you may just miss out on proof you should trust your initial instincts.

Få Roberts syn på nyheter från innehållsmarknadsföring på bara tre minuter:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

HANDPLOCKAT RELATERAT INNEHÅLL: Failure Is Always an Option (and an Opportunity)
Rose-Colored Glasses is a new weekly column in which Robert Rose shares his view of content marketing challenges. Every Friday, he offers reasoning, rationale, and rhetoric to help you advance the practice of content marketing in your organization.

Prenumerera till arbetsdags- eller veckovisa CMI-e-postmeddelanden för att få Rose-Colored Glasses i din inkorg varje vecka.

 
Omslagsbild av Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute





Källlänk

MARKNADSFÖRING

Hur ett icke-marknadsföringsinnehållsmetod gav prisbelönta resultat

Publicerad

How A Non-Marketing Content Approach Produced Award-Winning Results

Matt Hartley är ingen marknadsförare.

Och ändå är han en 2022 B2C Content Marketer of the Year finalist.

Även om det till synes inkongruent är det inte. Företag närmar sig inte alla innehåll (eller marknadsföring) med samma organisationsstruktur.

Matt leder den redaktionella strategin för TD Bank Group som senior chef på corporate and public affairs-avdelningen. Under hans ledning tog TD Stories hem högsta utmärkelser för programmet för bästa innehållsmarknadsföring i finansiella tjänster och fick finalistomnämnanden för lansering av bästa innehållsmarknadsföring och publicering av finansiella tjänster i 2022 Content Marketing Awards.

Dessa resultat bevisar att avdelning, titel och rapportstruktur inte spelar någon roll om innehållet fungerar.

”Vi berättar historier i linje med (företagets) kommunikationsmål. Vi är inte nödvändigtvis ute efter att sälja något. Det handlar om varumärkesbyggande, tankeledarskap, finansiell kompetens”, förklarar Matt.

Så här byggde en icke-marknadsförare finalist för Årets innehållsmarknadsförare ett prisbelönt program.

Om #Ccontent fungerar spelar detaljer som rapportstruktur, titel och avdelning ingen roll, säger @AnnGynn via @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

Lanserar nyhetsrummet

2018 gick Matt till TD som innehållsstrateg. Han anställdes delvis på grund av sin bakgrund inom att rapportera och skapa nya innehållsprodukter. Matt hade arbetat som teknikreporter på The Globe and Mail och National Post. Han skapade också Financial Post Tech Desk, ett hem för kanadensiska och internationella tekniska nyheter, och var grundare för Postens arkadvideospelnyhetssajt.

TD:s ledning hade insett det föränderliga medielandskapet. De såg färre förtjänade mediamöjligheter och vände sig till Matt för att hjälpa till att skala en TD-ägd kanal som heter TD Newsroom.

Medan TD Newsroom överensstämde med de externa kommunikationsmålen, slutade det med en intern publik – mindre än 10% besökare kom till webbplatsen utanför banken.

Vänd ut och in på innehållsprogrammet

TD Newsrooms betydelse växte när pandemin slog till 2020, vilket gjorde vissa former av traditionell kundkontakt omöjlig. Inte längre bara ett verktyg i kommunikationsverktygslådan, TD Newsroom blev avgörande.

"Att skapa vårt eget innehåll och kunna distribuera det blev avgörande för oss", säger Matt.

TD Newsroom-teamet fokuserade på att skapa varumärkestjänstejournalistik (innehåll avsett att hjälpa kunder), och trafiken till webbplatsen ökade avsevärt. Ämnen som bankuppgifter du kan utföra online, budgetering för inkomster som påverkats av covid och planering av en nödfond stod i centrum.

Det var början på TD Newsroom-utvecklingen.

"Vi tänkte om hur vi gjorde innehåll och var kunden var på sin resa", säger Matt. Teamet fördubblade också datadrivet innehåll och förfinade sin innehållsstrategi.

År 2021, TD Stories debuterade. "Det placerar kunden i centrum av historien. Den berättar historier som resonerar hos kunder och kollegor, säger Matt.

Sajtens slagord – "Berika liv en historia i taget" – speglar detta uppdrag.

TD Stories organiserar innehåll runt fem pelare (som visas i sajtnavigeringen i skärmdumpen ovan):

  • Dina pengar innehåller ekonomiska tips och råd.
  • Innovation lyfter fram ny teknik för att skapa mer personliga bankupplevelser.
  • gemenskap innehåller berättelser om TD:s engagemang i de samhällen där de är verksamma och där dess anställda bor.
  • Kollegor berättar de anställdas historier.
  • Insikter presenterar tankeledarskap från bankens chefer.

TD Stories placerar kunden i centrum av historien, säger @thehartleyTO från @TDnews_Canada, via @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

Att få allt att räknas

”Vi är ett litet men mäktigt team inom företagsfrågor. Det är ett platt team – alla kommer med idéer till bordet. Det skulle verkligen inte fungera om det inte var så sammanhållet som det är, säger Matt.

Det digitala innehållsteamet fungerar också lite som en byrå. Inom företagsaffärer arbetar de med relationshanterare för kategorier som personlig bankverksamhet, försäkring, amerikansk bankverksamhet, etc. samt produkt-, partnerskaps- och filantropiska chefer.

”Vi jobbar med dem för att skapa berättelserna. Vi kan vända oss till dem och be en ämnesexpert som hjälper oss att berätta en historia, etc.”, förklarar Matt. "Vi kunde inte existera i ett vakuum."

Han övervakar ett digitalt innehållsteam som inkluderar en datadriven strategiroll som har varit avgörande i TD Stories-utvecklingen. Det extra fokuset har hjälpt teamet i dess innehållsutveckling.

Till exempel bankens redaktionell kalender kretsar kring att upprepa deadlines och mönster. Tidsfrister för pensionsavgifter och inkomstdeklarationer sker under samma period varje år. Och varje vår börjar fler människor att jaga hus.

Med TD:s team för digitalt innehåll som utökar innehållsmätningsstrategin, kan Matt och teamet analysera hur väl dessa årliga innehållsbitar presterar. De kan också bättre förstå vad folk söker efter, så att de kan förfina och förbättra nästa innehållsupprepningar.

"Vi kan ta de ögonblicken och göra dem fräscha," förklarar Matt. "Vi kan säkerställa att kunden får den bästa och mest korrekta informationen som möjligt."

Mätvärdena återspeglar lagets dedikation till excellens. År 2021 ökade trafiken till TD Stories med mer än 125% från år till år. Nästan all trafik (98%) kommer från externa källor, inklusive 25% från organisk Google sökningar.

Att veta det verkliga målet

"I slutet av dagen är inte innehållet slutmålet. Målet är att hjälpa till att utbilda kunden och hjälpa dem att känna sig mer informerade och ekonomiskt trygga. När du har det i åtanke är den faktiska strukturen i en berättelse eller varje mening ett sätt att nå ett mål, säger Matt.

Att utbilda kunden är målet – berättelse och meningsstruktur är medlet för detta, säger @thehartleyTO från @TDnews_Canada via @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

Det är en del av den hemliga vetenskapen om varumärkesjournalistik. Som Matt förklarar: "Ta efter verksamhetens mål och förena dem med berättelser som kunderna tycker är engagerande och användbara."

Och det är en prisbelönt formel oavsett avdelningsnamn, titel eller organisationsstruktur.

Vill du ha fler tips, insikter och exempel på innehållsmarknadsföring? Prenumerera till arbetsdags- eller veckomail från CMI.

HANDPLOCKAT RELATERAT INNEHÅLL: 

Omslagsbild av Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute

!funktion(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)
{if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};
if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version='2.0′;
n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(fönster, dokument,'script',
'https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js');
fbq('init', '1432232210459613');
fbq('track', 'PageView');

Källlänk

Fortsätt läsa

MISSA INTE NÅGRA VIKTIGA NYHETER!
Prenumerera på vårt nyhetsbrev
Vi lovar att inte spamma dig. Avsluta prenumerationen när som helst.
Ogiltig e-postadress

Trendigt

sv_SESvenska