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YouTube Rolls Out New Features to Help Creators Boost Merch Sales

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YouTube is assisting creators with a new feature to boost merchandise sales, and a new report for measuring revenue.

Now, when people buy a creator’s merchandise during a live stream, the sale will be highlighted in the chat.

YouTube channels can access monthly insights about revenue in a new report in YouTube Studio.

Here’s more information about each of these updates.

New Monthly Performance Report

YouTube creators now have access to a performance report that combines multiple sets of data.

The new report, available in YouTube Studio, merges two existing monthly reports about subscribers and revenue. There’s also an all new analysis of video views.

YouTube Rolls Out New Features to Help Creators Boost Merch Sales

The report includes a new visualization with a monthly bar chart showing 13 months of data.

YouTube creators can use this report to quickly gauge monthly performance and identify potential seasonal trends.

You can find this report in YouTube Studio analytics in the Channel Overview section. It will be updated at the beginning of each month.

Live Alerts for Merchandise Purchases

YouTube is putting a greater emphasis on merchandise sales with a new alert that appears during live videos.

YouTube Rolls Out New Features to Help Creators Boost Merch Sales

When a creator’s merchandise is purchased during a live stream, an alert will be displayed to the whole chat room. This is similar to when someone becomes a member during a live stream, or sends a super chat.

This feature is available to creators who are utilizing Teespring to sell products on YouTube.

The alerts give creators a new way to promote merchandise during a stream, and give fans a way to show off their support for the channel.

Live alerts for merchandise have the potential to increase awareness about the creator’s merchandise, and boost sales as a result.

Related: YouTube Launches 4 New Features For Video Creators

Non-Advertising Revenue on the Rise

YouTube notes that non-advertising revenue for creators is on the rise.

More channels are earning money from YouTube’s other monetization programs such as Super Chats, Super Stickers, channel memberships, and physical merchandise sales.

Over the last 28 days alone over 80,000 YouTube channels earned money from one of those programs.

That represents an increase of 20% since March, and an increase of over 40% since January.

Since the beginning of March, over 2 million viewers have bought their first Super Chat, Super Sticker, or channel membership.

Super Chats and Super Stickers are a way to thank the creator monetarily during a live stream.

In return, purchasers either get to highlight a message in the chat, or post a large sticker, but they’re donation tools for the most part.

Channel memberships offer a bit more, though that all depends on the individual creator.

Paying a monthly membership fee to a channel can grant exclusive rewards such as members-only videos, members-only chats, and things of that nature.

Rewards will vary, however, as creators have full discretion over what they offer to members.

Channel memberships are still a relatively new feature, having only been introduced less than a year ago.

For more information, see: YouTube Introduces New Ways for Channels to Make Money.

To learn more about any of these new features, see YouTube’s announcement video below:

Related: YouTube to Show Creators What Time of Day Their Audience is Online

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Renting vs. Owning the Post-Review Local Consumer Journey

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Renting vs. Owning the Post-Review Local Consumer Journey

The author’s views are entirely his or her own (excluding the unlikely event of hypnosis) and may not always reflect the views of Moz.

Technology can be a conductor or a barrier. Everything we do to market local businesses is meant to culminate in a human encounter. When we get our part right (and external forces smile upon us), technology connects us. When we get our part wrong (or external forces impede us), technology can have the frustrating effect of sundering local brands from their customers, with everybody losing out on the deal.

The modern phenomenon of local search exemplifies the concept of a “mixed blessing”. Loss of control over significant parts of the customer journey can be a source of legitimate stress for owners and marketers. Stress isn’t good for us, of course, and that’s why I’m hoping this message brings some welcome relief: control of the most important aspects of the consumer journeys remains strongly on your side, and you can thrive without the parts you have to give up. We’ve got data to back this up, thanks to Moz’s recent report, The Impact of Local Business Reviews on Consumer Behavior, and I’m hoping today’s column will lift some burdens that may have been weighing you down.

The data

Let’s start out by taking a moment to really reflect on what it means that 96% of adults read local business reviews. Basically almost everyone in your community is perusing this content, making it the widest possible road to your front door, but the truth is that it exists in a space you only partially control. Given that only 11% of review-readers trust brand messaging over public opinion, reviews matter greatly, and it’s a tough reality that they mainly happen in digital spaces you rent rather than own.

If something goes wrong with your reviews on third party platforms like Google, Nextdoor, or Yelp, such as a spam attack, or the random disappearance of your reviews due to a bug or update, or a single irate customer shouting half-truths or downright falsehoods through a megaphone amid a small number of reviews, you have limited direct recourse for resolution. Platforms may or may not respond to your pleas for help, and some customers may ignore even your best offers to resolve their complaints – the sense of lost control is not imaginary.

Here is the good news: for 91% of your potential customers, the very next step they take after reading reviews will land them in spaces you own. 51% will head to your website, which you fully control, 27% will visit your place of business, which you also fully control, and 13% will contact you, and it’s you who control your phone and text lines, your email, forms, and live chat. Apart from the 8% that will move from reviews to the profiles you rent on social media platforms, management of customer experiences is almost all on your side and in your house.

Barring mishaps like your website being infected with malware, a temporary closure of your premises due to illness, or a power outage bringing down your phone lines, it turns out that you remain in charge of key customer/brand experiences during nearly all of the post-review consumer journey. Great news, indeed! But it carries some big responsibilities with it.

Converting on the next step after reviews

The wide funnel begins to narrow as consumers transition from reading reviews to their next steps. Winning maximum conversions from their next actions depends on having the right welcome in place in all three of these spaces:

The local business website

Whether customers click from the review profile to your website homepage, or to a landing page your listing is linked to, prepare this welcome for them:

  • An accessible, secure, technically-clean, optimized website housing the multi-media content and features the customer needs to take their next steps towards a transaction.

  • Highly visible information on every way in which the customer can contact and visit you, including phone, text, chat, messaging, email, forms, hours of operation, maps, and written directions.

  • Additional first-party reviews to provide further proofs of your good reputation and tide you over in times when bugs make your third-party reviews go missing.

  • A unique selling proposition to seal the deal.

Your place of business

Whether your place of business is your physical premises, or your clients’ locations, you can shine on this main stage with the following:

  • Exceptional customer service based on the training of your staff and good management of the entire customer service ecosystem. With 65% of review writers saying they’ve written negative reviews because of experiencing bad or rude customer service, building an employee-centric company that radiates both happiness and helpfulness is your best bet for building an excellent reputation.

  • Careful guardianship of your supply chain. 63% of review writers say they’ve written negative reviews after purchasing bad products. The quality of your inventory supports both repeat purchases and high ratings.

  • Accurate online local business listings. 52% of survey respondents have written negative reviews after encountering incorrect business information on the Internet. Use of listings management software like Moz Local can ensure that what’s published about your business online (like hours of operation, addresses, and key services) matches what the customer will experience in the real world, preventing inconvenience and disappointment.

Your contact options

Whether a review reader turns next to your phone line, text line, live chat, website form, or email, assist them towards a next conversion by:

  • Reducing on-hold times on your phone line to the bare minimum

  • Ensuring all public-facing representatives of the business are well-trained in your products, services and policies

  • Providing realistic estimates of when a customer will hear back if they are required to leave an email address on chat instead of speaking immediately to a live person

  • Reducing the number of form fields the customer is required to fill out before reaching you

  • Offering an after-hours support option

  • And, of course, for the 8% who will visit your rented spaces on social media platforms as their next step after reading reviews, be sure your full contact information is included on your profiles.

Despite the market disruption of the Internet, so much about local businesses remains the same

Infographic depicting the cycle of consumer engagement. Top middle: blue circle with image of person working at a computer, text:

While technological innovations are ongoing, it’s apparent that deeply-rooted consumer behaviors continue to follow a traditional pattern that’s existed for hundreds of years. In summary, people in your town want to know what others say about your business >>> people want to connect with your business for a possible transaction >>> people then tell others about what they experienced with your business. All of this cycle has always happened offline, and the only real change is that the means for some of this communication has partly transitioned online.

Just as business owners always had to do without the ability of controlling the word-of-mouth reputation their community was creating for them on front porches and over fences, modern business owners can live without directly controlling the online brand sentiment that exists in spaces they have to rent rather than owning. While it’s true that traditional PR may have had more power to shape public perception before online local business reviews made individual consumer voices so loud, the not-so-secret ingredient to brand longevity and loyalty remains unaltered: great customer experiences at and around the time of service are the foundation of success.

What every local business needs today is a thoughtful plan for managing the digital assets that now contribute to these positive consumer experiences. The winning recipe, then, is developing high standards for the spaces you own (your website, place of business, and most contact methodologies) and being as hands-on as possible in the spaces you rent (the online profiles containing your local business information, reviews, and social content). With a workable strategy and good quality tools for managing this ecosystem, the development of your good name in the community you serve will follow.

Knowledge is power; read Moz’s full survey report: The Impact of Local Business Reviews on Consumer Behavior

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How to Run A Content Audit in 2022

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How to Run A Content Audit in 2022

As a marketer, how often do you run content audits? How do you keep track of how content is performing? Do you use those metrics to improve future campaigns? (more…)

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Feds finally file anti-monopoly suit over Google’s adtech

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Feds finally file anti-monopoly suit over Google's adtech

The Department of Justice has filed its long-threatened antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using its adtech to create a monopoly. The suit seeks to force the tech giant get rid of its ad businesses and stop the company from engaging in allegedly anticompetitive practices.

“Having inserted itself into all aspects of the digital advertising marketplace, Google has used anticompetitive, exclusionary, and unlawful means to eliminate or severely diminish any threat to its dominance over digital advertising technologies,” the lawsuit says.

Why we care. Google simultaneously acting as broker, supplier and auctioneer of online ads has always been problematic at best. As Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) put it, “The conflicts of interest are so glaring that one Google employee described Google’s ad business as being like ‘if Goldman or Citibank owned the NYSE.’” Cracking down on monopolistic business practices does great things for the consumer and the economy. The breakup of AT&T in the 1980s is why communication is so inexpensive and widespread today.

In the past, Google has rebutted monopoly claims by pointing to the large number of other companies which facilitate online advertising. The company did not respond to a request for comment today. 

Dig deeper: Google offers adtech unit changes to fend off antitrust lawsuit

This is the fifth antitrust lawsuit filed by state and federal officials against Google since 2020. That year a group of states led by Texas filed an antitrust lawsuit over the company’s advertising technology, while the DOJ and another group of states sued Google over claims that it abused its dominance over online search. In 2021, several states also sued over Google’s app store practices.

Dig deeper: Antitrust bill could force Google, Facebook and Amazon to shutter parts of their ad businesses

Google and other tech giants are currently under pressure from governments around the world trying to restrain their power over online information and commerce. In the European Union, Amazon, Google, Apple and others have faced antitrust investigations and charges, as well as new laws limiting the use and collection of consumer data.


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About the author

Constantine von Hoffman

Constantine von Hoffman is managing editor of MarTech. A veteran journalist, Con has covered business, finance, marketing and tech for CBSNews.com, Brandweek, CMO, and Inc. He has been city editor of the Boston Herald, news producer at NPR, and has written for Harvard Business Review, Boston Magazine, Sierra, and many other publications. He has also been a professional stand-up comedian, given talks at anime and gaming conventions on everything from My Neighbor Totoro to the history of dice and boardgames, and is author of the magical realist novel John Henry the Revelator. He lives in Boston with his wife, Jennifer, and either too many or too few dogs.

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