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New Report Looks at Social Platform Performance Benchmarks by Industry

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When analyzing your social media performance metrics, you need a level of context to make sense of the numbers and ascertain where you can improve and what’s already working. Comparing the data against your own past stats is the best way to do this, and ensure that you’re aligning with your broader business goals, but it can also be helpful to benchmark your performance against others in your industry, providing further insight into where you’re at, and what you should expect.

That’s where this report comes in. This week, RivalIQ has released the latest version of its annual Social Media Industry Benchmark Report, for which they’ve gathered data on the social platform performance of more than 2,000 brands, incorporating some 5 million posts, tweets and updates.

The full report includes a heap of industry-specific insights, including popular hashtags and specific posting data, but in this post, we’re going to take a look at the overall trends for Facebook, Instagram ad Twitter to get an idea of where “good performance” on each currently stands.

First off on Facebook – according to RivalIQ’s data, the average Facebook Page engagement rate remained flat from its 2019 report at 0.09%

That’s not exactly inspiring – brand engagement rates on Facebook have remained fairly low, overall, for some time, though RivalIQ does note that the “Higher Education”, “Influencers”, and “Sports Teams” categories did see relative increases over the last year.

Of course, most Facebook Page managers would be aware of this, and there are other benefits to Facebook activity beyond organic engagement. But it’s worth noting the comparative benchmarks when analyzing your own Facebook Page performance.

In terms of posing frequency, RivalIQ found that the average Facebook posts per day across all sectors decreased by about 14% in 2019.

It’s difficult to say what would have lead to that decrease – brands seeing less response? Not wanting to flood News Feeds? It’s worth noting that, in the past, Facebook has advised that brands should:

“Post frequently – Don’t worry about over-posting. The goal of News Feed is to show each person the most relevant story so not all of your posts are guaranteed to show in their Feeds.”

So if over-posting is a concern, that’s likely outweighed by the algorithm anyway. But maybe brands are simply making other platforms a bigger focus, and that’s lead to a slightly lower average posting frequency on The Social Network.

Which leads us onto Instagram. The trending platform of the moment, Instagram, and Instagram Stories in particular, seems to be where brands are increasingly turning.

So, what’s the average engagement rate for brands on Insta?

Overall, the engagement rate for brands on Instagram has dropped – as per RivalIQ:

“Every industry in our study took a hit on Instagram this year, and the all-industry median decreased by 23% from 1.60% to 1.22%.”

That’s likely due to that increased focus – with more brands now competing for attention on the platform, everyone takes a bit of a hit. Still, 1.22% is a lot higher than Facebook, pointing to the ongoing opportunity of Instagram for engagement.

In terms of posting frequency, RivalIQ notes that the median posting frequency across all industries declined by 5% in 2019.

Not a huge reduction, but brands are not ramping up their Instagram activity in response to increased usage. This also doesn’t incorporate Stories data, where, as noted, more businesses are now looking.

Twitter, the data suggests that average tweet engagement has also dipped just slightly, down from 0.48% in its last report.

Enligt RivalIQ:

Twitter engagement remained consistent for the third year in a row, with Higher Ed and Alcohol staying ahead and Media pulling up the rear because of their high-frequency posting.”

It’s interesting to note the relative variance by sector, and to get some idea of what average tweet performance actually looks like. Maybe your business is doing better than you thought – and maybe, Twitter is a relatively good performer for you, based on the data.

Of course, as with all platforms, there are additional benefits to maintaining a consistent Twitter presence, but having some perspective on this element can be helpful in understanding your results.

In terms of tweets per day, tweeting frequency declined by about 10% this year.

This isn’t a major surprise – with Twitter’s algorithm now highlighting tweets of interest to each individual user, that’s lessened the impetus to tweet so often, to a degree, while in some ways it also acts as a disincentive to such, as your tweets from the previous day can get clustered together in the listing, and potentially overwhelm followers.

Twitter’s also not driving as much referral traffic as it once was, which is also somewhat reflected in the engagement stats. That’s seen some brands re-asses the amount of time they’re spending on the platform. Overall, tweet engagement is up year over year, according to the platform’s official stats, but the re-focus on conversations has seemingly impacted brand tweet engagement, at least to some degree,

There’s a heap more insight in RivalIQ’s full report, including industry-specific data and insights to help improve your strategy.

You can check out the full 2020 Social Benchmarks report här.

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MARKNADSFÖRING

How to ask customers for reviews (and actually get them)

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ss-rating-review-stars

ss-rating-review-stars

Outside of the food and hospitality industry, it can be a real struggle for businesses to get positive reviews.


Consumers don’t typically review their landscaper, gym, car rental agency and many other business types that they interact with on a daily basis unless something goes wrong.


Because of this, we talk daily with companies who do outstanding work and have a great real-world reputation but have more negative online reviews than positive ones.


For business owners, this disparity between offline and online reputation is beyond frustrating. So what’s a business owner or general manager to do when they find themselves in this situation?


Ask happy customers for reviews.


Tip the review balance back in your favor by getting those happy customers to be your online advocates. Below, I’ll share some tips, best practices and tests you can run to get more positive reviews.

Is it okay to ask for reviews?


But first, you may wonder: Is it okay to ask for reviews? For Google, the answer is a resounding “yes.”


Yelp, however, has much stricter guidelines when it comes to requesting reviews. Currently, Yelp prohibits businesses from requesting reviews in any way, shape, or form. One potential loophole to these guidelines is to request reviews verbally, either over the phone or in person.


You can ask a customer to search “[business name] Yelp” in Google, or “[business name] [location] Yelp” if your business has more than one location. This should lead the customer right to your Yelp listing.


You’ll also want to make sure the customer does not leave a review inside of your office/store, as Yelp may see the location and flag the review as solicited. One of the most important things to remember is to never offer a direct link to your Yelp listing, as this is one of the quickest ways Yelp can flag a review, or set of reviews, as solicited.


If you’d like to avoid Yelp guideline violations or potentially having your Yelp listing removed altogether, we suggest sticking to Google and other review platforms when requesting new reviews.


Remember to check each review site’s guidelines, as they may differ on what requests avenues are or aren’t allowed.


Now that we have that out of the way, let’s dive in…

The gold standard: Asking in person


There’s no better way to ask for, and get, reviews than to do it in person. The person-to-person request is incredibly effective, particularly if the requester has spent much time with the customer. We’ve found that asking in person can garner you seven to eight times more reviews than asking via email.


Let’s take a möbel store as an example. A sales associate might spend an hour or more helping customers pick and customize just the right couch for their home. They get to know each other over the course of that time and talk about where they’re from, their families and so on. A mini-bond is built in the time spent together.


At the end of the sale, there is now no person better positioned to ask for a review than this sales associate. The associate can explain that it helps other customers who are researching them and gives a true perspective on the business.


If you’re thinking about asking customers for reviews, try to figure out the customer touch points and who within the company builds the deepest relationship with the customer. That is likely the person who should be asking for reviews.


To make the process as simple as possible, you can display QR codes at the checkout counter or on a promotional flier given to the customer that länkar directly to your review site.

The ‘tip’ trick


The “tip” trick is one of those review growth hacks that can work great in particular industries. The strategy is that someone who has spent a lot of time with a customer then asks for a review but throws in the kicker of, “If you had a good experience and include my first name in the review, the company gives me a $10 tip.”


This little “sweetener” gives a customer the extra incentive to leave an online review, particularly if he or she had a good experience.


We’ve seen this strategy work best with services provided in and around customers’ homes. This includes landscapers, exterminators and movers.


The service providers work hard, and people sometimes want to tip them for their work; this strategy gives customers a free way to tip someone who did a good job.


For the right companies, this can drastically accelerate the number of reviews that come in.

Asking via email


Asking for reviews via email is a bit trickier. There are cases where you don’t have a lot (or any) face time with a customer. In those instances, email may be your only option.


If you’re going to ask for reviews via email, we strongly encourage you to pre-screen your customers via an internal survey before following up with another email asking them for a public review. While this may sound like cheating, it’s no different from what you would do in person.


If someone is clearly upset, you wouldn’t ask them for an online review. Likewise, using triggers from an internal survey allows you to apply this same human logic, just algorithmically.


Here are some of the best practices for your email request letter:

  • Have the email come from a real person’s email address (Even better, have it come from a name they’d recognize, such as someone they worked with).
  • Have the email written as a personal request from that same person.
  • Have a very clear call-to-action link/button. Remove random social media or website footer länkar — just as with good conversion rate optimization, have a singular goal of users clicking the review button.
  • Test using a plain-text email versus an HTML email.
  • Test different subject lines: We’ve found that using the person’s name in the subject line works well in many instances but falls completely flat in a few others.
  • Test different email copy to see what performs best.


As with any good campaign, test everything until you’re getting the best conversion-to-review rate possible (not just open rate). Email will almost never perform as well as asking in person, but it can still be very effective at scale.

An organizational initiative


We’ve seen that reviews tend to be a slow trickle until getting them is truly adopted as an organizational initiative, not just some side project done by marketing.


The best strategies for making reviews a priority across an organization include:

  • Making better reviews a top-down focus. Executives need to communicate the importance.
  • Obtaining organizational buy-in on the importance of reviews by helping employees understand the direct impact they have on the business.
  • Training key employees on how to ask for reviews.
  • Developing a scorecard that tracks reviews by locations (similar to our SERP score, but for reviews).
  • Providing bonuses and awards for the locations that have the best online reviews.
  • Putting the C-suite behind the online reviews initiative is the absolute best way to get action to be taken.

Fight back


Simply asking for reviews starts to put the power back into your hands. Many business owners just throw their hands up in the air and assume there is nothing they can do. But as you can see, it’s quite the opposite.


Asking for reviews requires no special tools or technology, just a commitment to see it through. Using these strategies, you can fight back against the phenomenon of businesses (outside of the food and hospitality industry) only getting negative reviews.


This article was researched and written with the help of Dominique Jabbour.

use of this, we talk daily with companies who do outstanding work and have a great real-world reputation, but have more negative online reviews than positive.

For business owners, this disparity between offline and online reputation is beyond frustrating. So what’s a business owner or general manager to do when they find themselves in this situation?

Ask happy customers for reviews.

Tip the review balance back in your favor by getting those happy customers to be your online advocates. Below, I’ll share some tips, best practices and tests you can run to get more positive reviews.

But first, you may be wondering: Is it okay to ask for reviews? For Google, the answer is a resounding “yes.”

Yelp, however, has issued conflicting statements on whether or not you’re allowed to ask customers for reviews. I asked Yelp directly, and they told me that it är okay to ask for reviews as long as there is no incentivizing (See #2 in “5 Yelp facts business owners should know”). For all of the other review sites, you’ll need to check their terms of service and guidelines.

Now that we have that out of the way, let’s dive in…

The gold standard: Asking in person

There’s no better way to ask for, and get, reviews than to do it in person. The person-to-person request is incredibly effective, particularly if the requester has spent a lot of time with the customer. We’ve found that asking in person can garner you seven to eight times more reviews than asking via email.

Let’s take a furniture store as an example. A sales associate might spend an hour or more helping a customer pick out and customize just the right couch for their home. They get to know each other over the course of that time, talk about where they’re from, their families, and so on. A mini-bond is built in the time spent together.

At the end of the sale, there is now no person better positioned to ask for a review than this sales associate. The associate can explain that it helps other customers who are researching them and gives a true perspective on the business.

If you’re thinking about asking customers for reviews, first try to figure out the customer touch points and who within the company builds the deepest relationship with the customer. That is likely the person who should be asking for reviews.

The “tip” trick

The “tip” trick is one of those review growth hacks that can work really great in particular industries. The strategy is that someone who has spent a lot of time with a customer then asks for a review, but throws in the kicker of, “If you had a good experience and include my first name in the review, the company gives me a $10 tip.”

This little “sweetener” gives a customer the extra incentive to leave an online review, particularly if he or she had a good experience.

We’ve seen this strategy work best with services provided in and around customers’ homes. This includes landscapers, exterminators and movers.

The service providers work hard, and people sometimes want to tip them for their work; this strategy gives customers a free way to tip someone who did a good job.

For the right companies, this can drastically accelerate the number of review that come in.

Asking via email

Asking for reviews via email is a bit trickier. There are cases where you don’t have a lot (or any) face time with a customer. In those instances, email may be your only option.

If you’re going to ask for reviews via email, we strongly encourage you to pre-screen your customers via an internal survey before following up with another email asking them for a public review. While this may sound like cheating, it’s no different from what you would do in person.

If someone is clearly upset, you wouldn’t ask them for an online review. Likewise, using triggers from an internal survey allows you to apply this same human logic, just algorithmically.

Here are some of the best practices for your email request letter:

  1. Have the email come from a real person’s email address (Even better, have it come from a name they’d recognize, such as someone they worked with).
  2. Have the email written as a personal request from that same person.
  3. Have a very clear call-to-action link/button. Remove random social media or website footer länkar — just as with good conversion rate optimization, have a singular goal of users clicking the review button.
  4. Test using a plain-text email versus an HTML email.
  5. Test different subject lines: We’ve found that using the person’s name in the subject line works well in many instances but falls completely flat in a few others.
  6. Test different email copy to see what performs best.

As with any good campaign, test everything until you’re getting the best conversion-to-review rate possible (not just open rate). Email will almost never perform as well as asking in person, but it can still be very effective at scale.

An organizational initiative

We’ve seen that reviews tend to be a slow trickle until getting them is truly adopted as an organizational initiative, not just some side project done by marketing. The best strategies for making reviews a priority across an organization include:

  1. Making better reviews a top-down focus; executives need to communicate the importance.
  2. Obtaining organizational buy-in on the importance of reviews by helping employees understand the direct impact they have on the business.
  3. Training key employees on how to ask for reviews.
  4. Developing a scorecard that tracks reviews by locations (similar to our SERP score, but for reviews).
  5. Providing bonuses and awards for the locations that have the best online reviews.

Putting the C-suite behind the online reviews initiative is the absolute best way to get action to be taken.

Fight back

The simple act of asking for reviews starts to put the power back into your hands. Many business owners just throw their hands up in the air and assume there is nothing they can do. But as you can see, it’s quite the opposite.

Asking for reviews doesn’t require any special tools or technology, just a commitment to see it through. Using these strategies, you can fight back against the phenomenon of businesses (outside of the food and hospitality industry) only getting negative reviews.


Åsikter som uttrycks i den här artikeln är gästförfattarens och inte nödvändigtvis MarTech. Personalförfattare är listade här.



Om författaren

Brian PattersonBrian Patterson

Brian Patterson is partner and co-founder of Go Fish Digital, and is responsible for researching and developing strategies for Online Reputation Management (ORM), SEO, and managing web development projects. He blogs on the GFD blog and can be found on Twitter@brianspatterson.

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