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The AI content creation space is growing

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The AI content creation space is growing


A new scorecard and report from analyst firm AIContentGen analysed 20 AI-powered copywriting software solutions. The firm says there are now more than 50 vendors in the AI content space. Although the vendors have large social and community followings, AIContentGen cannot yet estimate the number of locked-in customers. AIContentGen Senior Analyst John Cass told us, “The industry has grown rapidly, with over 53 companies, as our market map shows, and while the number of companies doesn’t indicate clients it does highlight the market development. It is time to start exploring the use of these tools.”

A number of the solutions have sophisticated features, Cass noted. Peppertype.ai, for example, offers to draft content specifically for Twitter and LinkedIn as well as conventional blogs. Wordhero has over 50 types of content in its toolbox, from Amazon product descriptions to video titles. NeuralText automatically optimizes content for SEO. According to a recent IBM report, over half of executives expect AI to change the way content creators do their work. This is likely driven, in part, by what Cass identifies as the content production gap. “There is space between the amount of high-quality content corporate marketing and communication teams can produce and what needs to be generated,” he said.

Why we care. It’s around ten years since natural language generation (NLG) proved capable of creating automated sports and business earnings reports. Indeed, as the landscape from AIContentGen shows, Persado began using mathematical models to generate email subject lines in 2012.

There has been trepidation about using it in risky scenarios, such as generating instruction or safety manuals or communicating important information to consumers. Cass said, “In the scorecard, we review where teams should be prudent in the use of AI Content Generation tools, and look at such issues as internal controls process, bias in AI, regulatory compliance and brand identity.”

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Read next: John Cass discusses agile marketing with other panelists at MarTech

In any case, just as neural networks and deep learning produced rapid advances in AI’s ability to detect patterns, recognize images and even analyse video, we shouldn’t be surprised to see an acceleration in the development of NLG.

Please note, this story was not written by a robot.

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About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space. He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020. Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.



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MARKETING

Marketing operations talent is suffering burnout and turnover

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Marketing operations talent is suffering burnout and turnover

“It’s hard to hire; it’s hard to train; it’s hard to keep people from burning out. To make matters worse, these challenges have intensified so swiftly that leaders have hardly had time to digest them, let alone mount a defense.”

That’s the main takeaway from “The State of Marketing Operations: 2022,” a new report from junior marketing ops training platform Highway Education and ABM leader Demandbase. The findings were based primarily on a survey of 800 marketing operations professionals from organizations of all sizes, more than half from mid-sized companies.

The demand for talent. The vastly accelerated shift to digital marketing — not to mention sales and service — has led inflated demand for MOps talent, a demand the market can’t keep up with. Two results: burnout as too much is demanded of MOps professionals; and turnover, as it’s easy to find alternative opportunities. The outcome for companies is the growing burden of hiring and training replacements.

Use of marketing software has grown two and a half times in less than ten years, according to the report, and the number of marketing operations professionals, across organizations of all sizes, has increased by two-thirds. Use of marketing automation alone has grown 228% since 2016, and there has been a 66% growth in the size of MOps teams just since 2020.

Perhaps most remarkable, 93% of MOps professionals learned on the job.


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Why we care. Providing beginner MOps training services, Highway Education clearly has an interest in this data. At the same time, there can be little doubt that the demand for MOps talent is real and growing. If there’s a surprising figure here, it’s that use of marketing software has grown only two and a half times in the last decade.

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AWS MOps leader Darrell Alfonso, quoted in the report, says: “There’s a disconnect between marketing strategy and the actual execution — what it takes to actually operationalize and bring a strategy to life. Leadership, especially the ‘old guard,’ will be more familiar with traditional methods like field marketing and commercials. But now, during the pandemic and post, there’s an entire digital world that needs to be
managed by people who know what they’re doing.”

See also  Marketing operations talent is suffering burnout and turnover

Read next: More on marketing ops from Darrell Alfonso


About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space. He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020. Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.

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