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Protecting Your Data And IT Infrastructure From Drone-Based Cyber-Attacks

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Protecting Your Data And IT Infrastructure From Drone-Based Cyber-Attacks


In recent years, the usage of drones in smart cities has risen for a variety of applications.

Businesses and data owners must be wary of the cyber threats posed by such devices at all times.

In early 2020, there were about 1.5 million registered drones in the US alone. To say that drones have become ubiquitous would be a massive understatement in today’s times. Drones are readily available in online and offline retail stores for purchase for those with the means to do so. Major companies such as Amazon have tested drone-based deliveries in recent times. In smart cities, one can simply expect such numbers to be further magnified. The omnipresence of drones in smart cities is a major cybersecurity threat too for businesses and digitized government operations.

Threats Associated with Drones

As you may know, drones contain intelligent cameras that can be used to monitor specific zones. The mobility of drones, coupled with their data capturing capabilities, can be used by malicious elements for spying purposes. In fact, cybercriminals need not use their own drones for spying—they can hack into an operational drone used by smart city administrators or businesses to extract sensitive information. Once hackers “break into” such systems, they can breach sensitive aerial data captured and also disable the functions—alarms, optical sensors—of drones to render them completely useless. This may lead to abrupt disruptions in business operations as the data capturing and actuating elements in drones go offline after a cyber-attack. Apart from this, hackers can simply illegally gain control of a drone before crashing it into important equipment to disrupt business or public operations. These are commonly known as attack drones. Additionally, carrier drones can be deployed to create a “fake Wi-Fi network” to manipulate the internet traffic of businesses and steal their data or damage their IT infrastructure in other ways.  

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Solutions for Drone-Based Cyber Threats

To deal with drone-based data security threats, businesses can use SoundWave detection tools. These tools sense the presence of drones in close proximity. So, once unauthorized drones are detected near the organizational property, businesses and public agencies in smart cities can take preventive measures to reduce the chances of digital trespassing by cybercriminals via drones. Businesses can also use intelligent firewall systems to secure their broadband networks and prevent potential data breaches and manipulation.

Every business executive knows how valuable data is in today’s times. Drone-based cyber threats generally involve attempts to either access company data illegally or corrupt it. Hackers use drones in smart cities to carry out data breach operations. By employing the requisite cyber protection infrastructure and monitoring data networks closely, businesses can reduce their vulnerability factor and keep drone-based data security threats at bay.     



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TECHNOLOGY

How Blockchain and Big Data Can Work Together

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How Blockchain and Big Data Can Work Together


Big data and blockchain work well together by providing more security and integrity. 

One is transforming data management while the other is changing the nature of transactions altogether. Could they create an even more significant impact on the industries by binding together – big data for blockchain or blockchain for big data?.

Big data technologies first came into the picture at the dawn of this millennium to meet the computational needs of large datasets in the Internet-era. Proprietary applications like BigTable by Google and ZooKeeper at Yahoo showcased the potential of big data. However, the potential could only be tapped into after open-source projects such as the Hadoop File System (HDFS) and Hadoop MapReduce hit the market. Since then, big data has snowballed to transform how companies manage their data in the 21st century. Satoshi Nakamoto, an anonymous mystic individual, introduced the world to blockchain in 2008. It was developed in an attempt to solve the problem of double spending in transactions by eliminating the need for a third party in financial transactions. Blockchain also gave the world its first digital cryptocurrency – the bitcoin. Since then, the concept of blockchain has rapidly evolved to provide robust solutions to problems persisting in a wide array of industries. Now that both big data and blockchain are established as effective tools to tackle issues in different domains, we look forward to – possible methods of integrating both big data and blockchain to deliver even better solutions to specific problems, or as we’ve called it in this article, blockchain for big data and big data for blockchain.

How Big Data Works With Blockchain

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A lot of governments have had trouble with the anonymity clause of blockchain. Despite being favored for its security and infallibility, blockchains are turned down for not being able to track stakeholders in transactions, thus being a preferred choice for illegal trade. Big data applications can help make blockchains trackable by managing structured datasets of wallet addresses and their owner details. This kind of infrastructure can convince governments to adopt blockchain as a platform for transactions that demand speed, safety, reliability, and traceability – thanks to big data for blockchain.

The Close Ties Between Blockchain and Big Data

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Big data is comfortably dealing with huge sets of data, but some issues in its infrastructure have posed a problem in the widespread adoption of the technology. The big data infrastructure is centralized to a server location that offers complete unconditional control of data to the ones who have access to the server. This ‘ownership’ creates a problem when big data infrastructure is to be shared between different companies or even different regional offices of the same company. Besides, having multiple copies at different locations is not a solution because it puts a burden on resources and also creates confusion while determining the most updated data resource. Furthermore, now that big data resources are being traded among different entities, the legitimacy of a data resource poses a concern. With a blockchain for big data, we can create a decentralized data resource to which every one has full access. We can also track updates to the data resource on the blockchain, eliminating the need for and confusion due to multiple copies. Moreover, data transactions can be verified for legitimacy using blockchain concepts like proof-of-work or proof-of-stake and at the same time blockchain can provide a robust financial platform for data transactions between entities.

It is incredible how both of these technologies – big data and blockchain – can together significantly improve the usability of each other. The techniques can help create a hybrid infrastructure on pillars of big data and blockchain. The infrastructure will be flexible for different application types, like its parents – big data and blockchain.

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