Connect with us

MARKETING

How to Get Other Sites to Link to Your Content (and Why You Should)

Published

on

How to Get Other Sites to Link to Your Content (and Why You Should)

Content marketing as a strategy centers around the idea that providing value to readers will eventually convert them to customers. But, content creation isn’t just about the direct funnel from Google to your site to sales. Your content can and should help your peers, too – even those who might be seen as your competition.

A more collaborative attitude can lead to ‘authority links’ – where a piece of content from an organization with a certain amount of clout links to your content for supporting evidence or further information.

Authority links are great for boosting your search engine optimization (SEO) and improving your brand awareness, which in turn helps grow your email list and the return on your lead generation – and the good news is you have more control than it might seem over whether you get those links or not.

It might feel like you’re just blogging into the ether and nobody is sharing your content, but fear not: there are ways to get other sites – great, popular, well-ranked sites – to link to your site, and it’s not as hard as it might seem.

Why You Want Authority Backlinks

Any link to your content will improve your SEO – boosting your content up the ranks of a Google search, for example – but the ‘authority’ part isn’t an empty qualifier. The more highly-ranked the linker is, the more that link means for your ranking, because according to the logic of search engines, quality sources only link to other quality sources.

Authority links are also one of the best types of traffic generators, something akin to everyone’s favorite sales and marketing tool: word of mouth. While they may not drive traffic back to your site in the same volume as advertising or social media, they carry the weight – or authority – of a recommendation.

When a customer sees a link to your content on another business’s page, that tells them that A) you have something important and relevant to add to the conversation and B) you’re a reliable source of information, according to someone whose content they already trust. They arrive at your page ready to hear what you have to say.

See also  PPC In 2020: 2 Experts Weigh In On Future Trends [Video]

Of course, for this to work, you’ll want to make sure that the links you receive are coming from an equally reliable and relevant source, which leads us to the next point – figuring out where to aim when seeking authority links to your blog posts.

Where to Get Backlinks

As with so many elements of life, your first port of call in seeking authority links will be Google. Just like you’d use it to find relevant, reliable sources when creating your own content, you can also reverse that process and use it to search for similar, applicable content on other sites. This is a great way to get a sense of who might be interested in adding a link back to your site.

When you have a long list of potential link sources, it’s time to do some deeper research to see which businesses align best with your messaging – authority links are a partnership of sorts, so think about what brands you’d want to partner with. Of course, culture and brand values will come into play, but there are more concrete considerations as well.

Here are a few things you should take into account when deciding whether or not to reach out to another business and request a linkback:

  • Audience: You’ll want to seek out brands and businesses that have a similar target audience to yours so the traffic they drive your way will already be receptive to your message. This can include companies in your same industry, but it can also include brands that share a demographic with yours – say, other millennial women-owned businesses.
  • Industry and Service: A more formulaic way to figure out where to aim for links is to look at the industry you’re targeting and then narrow the search even further by service. For example, if you’re looking at the beauty industry, both big names like Sephora and smaller companies like Thrive Causemetics will fit the industry bill, but if you offer a particular service – like cuticle rescue or specialty manicures – you’ll want to narrow further to the nail care sector.
  • SEO: Before you do the legwork to try to get authority links from another brand, make sure it’ll be worth your while. Use SEO tools like SEMrush to check details like their site’s authority score, organic and paid search traffic, and backlinks. This will give you a sense of how great their online authority is, which will tell you whether you want to try and absorb some of that authority for your site.
See also  Brandwatch is acquired by Cision for $450M, creating a PR, marketing and social listening giant

With those three elements in mind, it’s time to get started on your approach!

How to Secure Backlinks

Now that you have a list of other brands and companies you’d like to link back to your content, there are a few ways to convince them that it’s worth their time.

1. Publish Valuable Content

The number one rule of content marketing is always to publish high-quality content. Your posts should add clear value to the conversation, no matter their subject. They should be interesting, educate readers, and ideally fill a need with the information they provide.

If your content isn’t high quality, with compelling imagery and graphics, other sites won’t want to link to it – and even if they did, the people who clicked those links wouldn’t stick around to read it, let alone convert to sales.

2. Implement an Outreach Plan

Send an email to the company’s support channel or, if you can find individual contact info, to their content manager. It’s always good to start with a compliment or two, but make sure to be specific by referencing a particular piece of their content and pointing out what you admired about it and why. This not only butters them up but also shows that this is a thoughtful message, not an indiscriminate email blast.

Next, share a link to and a summary of your own content – the piece you’re hoping they’ll link to – and explain why you think it will add value to their site. Maybe it digs deeper on one angle of a subject they’ve covered more broadly or serves as a unique, well-executed example of something they’re teaching their readers how to do. Make your case!

Lastly, if the brand is one of your top choices, you can offer them something concrete in exchange for a link back. Some ideas include: offering to write a blog post on a subject that benefits them; suggesting a link exchange, where you link to the content of their choice in one of your blog posts; or giving them a chance to publish one of their articles on your blog.

See also  5 Benefits to Using Visual Content in PDF Marketing Materials

You can also offer to interview one of their subject matter experts (SMEs) for an article, which gives them even more authority and also incentivizes them to promote on social media.

Remember how we said this is a partnership of sorts? The ‘of sorts’ part is up to you: it can be as transactional as a simple link exchange or as involved as a co-produced webinar or co-branded resource. How deep you want the relationship to be will likely depend on the company’s relevance and status in the three areas mentioned above: audience, industry, and SEO.

You probably won’t hear back from everyone, but you definitely won’t hear back if you don’t reach out, so give it a go! You might even find you’re able to establish a longer-term relationship with one or two brands, one that benefits you both.

3. Use Backlinks Tools or Services

There’s a tool or service for just about everything, and that includes accumulating high-quality, relevant backlinks. Look for tools out there that will help you get in touch with other content managers so you can get access to more backlink opportunities. Look for agencies or Slack groups that make the process easy and that are transparent about their terms. You want to make sure that you aren’t involved in anything that encourages link stuffing or too much promotion because those efforts could negatively impact your SEO.

Authority links to your content from relevant businesses are great for improving your brand awareness, boosting your SEO, and bolstering your lead generation efforts – and you don’t just have to hope and pray for them to happen! With a little thought and research, a willingness to reciprocate, and some proactive engagement, you can increase your authority links significantly and start seeing the rewards of a collaborative mindset.

Source

MARKETING

Podcast advertising spend surged in 2021

Published

on

Podcast advertising spend surged in 2021


According to data released by advertising intelligence platform MediaRadar, spending on podcast advertising was up over 20% YoY in 2021. Q4 ad spend alone was $160 million, making a total of $590 million for the year. It is estimated that more than a third of Americans now listen to podcasts regularly. Technology brands became the biggest spenders, pushing media into second place.

Familiar names among the top 10 highest spending podcast advertisers are Amazon, Capital One, Comcast and State Farm. Most podcast advertising is located midroll with durations of 30 and 60 seconds being most common. Brands seem confident in the effectiveness of podcast advertising, with 79% of advertisers from 2020 continuing to buy in 2021.

Read next: How to get the best ROI from podcast advertising

Why we care. We say yet again, channels are proliferating. This means fragmented audiences, of course, but also potentially highly engaged audiences. Podcasts create the opportunity for focused contextual advertising as well as for more general brand messaging.

Speaking of messages, consumers (and B2B buyers) are delivering a clear one. Meet us where we are.


About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space. He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020. Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.

See also  5 Ways to Generate Fresh, Intriguing Audience-Targeted Content Ideas



Source link

Continue Reading

MARKETING

How to scale personalization efforts with data-driven marketing

Published

on

Why data-driven decision-making is the foundation of successful CX


Tristan Silhol, senior manager of consulting at data company Artefact, recently worked with hygiene, health and nutrition CPG company Reckitt to revitalize their marketing campaigns. Their goal was to move Reckitt from a mass-market marketing approach to more personalized customer targeting.

“Typical strategic marketing teams are focused on assumption-based marketing,” he said in his presentation at our MarTech conference. “So, essentially building media campaigns and personalization based on external factors such as consumer surveys, brand knowledge, demographic data, national demographic data, statistical data, and consumption data.”

He added, “This is great to build broad campaigns, but it might not be sufficient when current customers expect a lot of personalization and a certain level of relationship.”

Source: Tristan Silhol

Moving from assumption-based marketing to data-driven marketing is no simple task. It takes a lot of coordination and resources to focus less on external factors and more on individual customer data. But, with the right strategies in place, marketers will have a much easier time adjusting their campaigns.

Adopt data-driven marketing strategies

While “data-driven marketing” sounds like a commonplace tactic, it’s actually a relatively new way of structuring campaigns. Traditional marketing relied on assumption-based strategies to figure out what customers wanted. Now, new marketing technologies allows brands to make decisions based on real-time customer data.

“More and more brands are innovating with data-driven marketing practices, trying to put data at the center of that marketing process,” said Silhol. “What this means is consolidating three types of data, one being first-party data — transactional data, CRM, and other digital assets that you may own as a company. They’re merging this with second-party data from retailers such as Walmart or Amazon. Programmatic technologies are also expanding their reach with third-party data and open-source data.”

See also  5 Big Content Trends for 2020

“This data-driven marketing piece represents a very large piece of the untapped opportunities for brands, and it requires a lot of capabilities and innovation,” he added.

According to Silhol, CPG companies often have a difficult time translating traditional consumer and market insights-based segmentation into addressable audiences due to lack of a data-driven approach: “Often those companies end up arbitrarily targeting segments online and having this disconnect between what is available in terms of addressable audiences and their marketing segmentation.”

Source: Tristan Silhol

To combat these challenges, Silhol recommends marketers turn to their marketing operations setup to see how optimized it is for analytics and data procurement.

Center digital marketing operations on data and analytics

In the same presentation, Guilherme Amaral of Reckitt discussed how he worked with Artefact’s team to introduce customer data and insights into their campaign automation.

“We started a whole program of digital transformation focused on transforming the way we run digital media campaigns,” he said. “This was just the first step in terms of setting up successful campaigns.”

He added, “We also talked about the right data, the right processes, the right technology, and internalizing some of these capabilities as well.”

Source: Tristan Silhol

Internalization was a major piece of Reckitt’s marketing ops transformation. By internalizing operations, it was able to reduce spend on external measurement tools, centralize customer data, build audiences with its own AI, and measure data independently.

“We ran an assessment, looking at what a few other peer companies were doing,” Amaral said. “In simple terms, we needed to internalize the martech, so we standardized and internalized a lot of our technology. Then we needed to develop technology or capabilities to drive consumer segmentation and audience building — that’s what (Artefact’s) audience engine is.”

See also  Please fill out this form

Implement an audience management system

Artefact helped Reckitt implement audience management technology to help scale these data-driven marketing efforts.

“It’s about having the ability to centralize first-party, second-party, and third-party data in your data warehouse,” Silhol said. “Then build your audiences, integrate them in your current operating model, and generate insights from those audiences to have that constant test and learn approach. Then you’re able to orchestrate those audiences in an automated fashion.”

Source: Tristan Silhol

With upcoming consumer data regulations, marketers need ways to take advantage of all their customer data, especially if they hope to deliver personalized experiences. Audience management platforms (such as the audience engine), combined with data-driven marketing strategies and operations, have the potential to address this with improved campaign efficiency and personalization.

“We’re studying the foundations of the audience engine and our first-party data strategy,” said Anna Humphreys, who also works at Reckitt, in the same presentation. “They are what we need to prioritize to succeed with the website.”

She added, “We’re still working and evolving because the audience engine has been so impactful for our business.”


About The Author

Corey Patterson is an Editor for MarTech and Search Engine Land. With a background in SEO, content marketing, and journalism, he covers SEO and PPC to help marketers improve their campaigns.



Source link

Continue Reading

MARKETING

What is a Product Marketing Manager? Job Description and Salary

Published

on

What is a Product Marketing Manager? Job Description and Salary


Your research and development team has been working on a new product for months and putting valuable resources into its design and manufacturing. They’ve carefully researched the market and the problem they intend to solve.

(more…)

See also  Every startup is a bank — or wants to be
Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending